Kegged beer going flat

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Lloydarcher01
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Kegged beer going flat

Post by Lloydarcher01 » Mon May 30, 2011 5:44 pm

This is my first time using a keg system so I'm very new to this way of carbonation. Because this is my first time using a keg, I just went with a coopers Canadian blonde kit, so I could focus more on correcting keg problems, rather then correcting beer problems.

So the beer tastes great but here is my problem. Once I pour it, its crisp, carbonated and perfect, for 2-3 minutes. After that time it seems to go completely flat. Not sure what is causing this, everything is hooked up right, no leaks or anything. PSI is set to 12-13.

If anyone has any input I'd love to hear any and all suggestions. I'm willing to try anything right now. Summer is here and I'm excited to get this working properly.

If you need any more information just let me know, I'm not sure what other info you may need to troubleshoot.

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slothrob
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Low Carb Kegging

Post by slothrob » Tue May 31, 2011 6:17 am

Do you get a lot of foam when you pour?

If the beer line isn't long enough for the pressure you're using, you can lose a lot of carbonation due to foaming during the pour.
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Lloydarcher01
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Post by Lloydarcher01 » Tue May 31, 2011 12:05 pm

I get a lot of foam if I pour very slowly. But if i open the tap all the way and pour fast then I get almost no foam

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flat beer

Post by slothrob » Tue May 31, 2011 8:22 pm

You definitely want to open the tap all the way. Avoiding too much foam will keep the carbonation in the beer.

Another consideration is the beer/fridge temperature. The specific psi doesn't mean much without the beer temperature. For example, 12 psi at 35°F will give you a moderately high carbonation level of 2.7 volumes (similar to BMC, I believe), while 45°F will deliver the moderately low level of 2.25 volumes (closer to the carbonation of a British beer). Perhaps that might drop to 2 as the beer sits in the glass for a while. Depending on your preferred carbonation level, you may perceive carbonation close to 2 as virtually flat.
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Post by ColoradoBrewer » Sat Jun 04, 2011 9:47 am

How long has the beer under CO2? It sounds to me like you started drinking it before it was fully carbonated. Are you leaving the gas turned on all the time?

As to excessive foam. The length of the beer line you need is also affected by its diameter. Most of us use 3/16" beverage tubing, and about 5-6 feet seems to work well. Have you balanced your system? Also, make sure you're using tubing specifically intended for dispensing beverages. The interior walls are smoother which helps to reduce foaming.
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