Pilsner Mashing Times

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swanneext
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Pilsner Mashing Times

Post by swanneext » Mon Jan 02, 2017 6:44 pm

I've been brewing for 16 years but never tried to lager. I'm putting together my first recipe for a pilsner (Prima clone) and am pretty confused on the mashing times. Some with double or triple decoction to straight up 90 minutes or less. I'm thinking of starting with just a simple mash time then move from there. Can anyone tell me, or explain what I should be considering in determining mash times?
Thanks so much!
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slothrob
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Re: Pilsner Mashing Times

Post by slothrob » Tue Jan 03, 2017 6:34 am

You can make a great pilsner with a 60 minute single-infusion mash. Pilsner malt is high in enzymes because it is lightly kilned and tends to convert very easily.

Some brewers might choose to mash longer to try and sqeeze a little more efficiency out of the mash, since Pilsners are often mashed at a low temperature, like 148°F. To get my full efficiency, I increase the mash temp to 158-162°F for the last 10-20 minutes, but the gain is relatively small. Decoction is unnecessary with all but very specialized malts, so that is something some brewers might do because of a slight flavor difference they perceive, but I wouldn't make my first one that way.
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Crusty
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Re: Pilsner Mashing Times

Post by Crusty » Tue Feb 18, 2020 12:47 am

slothrob wrote:
Tue Jan 03, 2017 6:34 am
You can make a great pilsner with a 60 minute single-infusion mash. Pilsner malt is high in enzymes because it is lightly kilned and tends to convert very easily.

Some brewers might choose to mash longer to try and sqeeze a little more efficiency out of the mash, since Pilsners are often mashed at a low temperature, like 148°F. To get my full efficiency, I increase the mash temp to 158-162°F for the last 10-20 minutes, but the gain is relatively small. Decoction is unnecessary with all but very specialized malts, so that is something some brewers might do because of a slight flavor difference they perceive, but I wouldn't make my first one that way.
I fully agree.
I always do a 90min mash for Lagers for the reasons slothrob pointed out.
Highly modified malts we use today convert much more easily than the malts used in the past so a 60min rest will suffice but at the lower mashing temps, a 90min rest is beneficial & will ensure you get every last drop of fermentable sugars from your grain.
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