Is it bad to leave the trub in?

Brewing processes and methods. How to brew using extract, partial or all-grain. Tips and tricks.

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birdhunter
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Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2000 4:55 pm

Is it bad to leave the trub in?

Post by birdhunter » Fri May 11, 2001 2:53 am

Does trub affect the flavor of the beer if it is left in during fermentation? I try to get some of it out when transferring from the brew pot to the fermenter, but there is always some left in there.

xbrewer
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trub removal

Post by xbrewer » Fri May 11, 2001 3:31 pm

Leaving trub in your wort will likely produce undesirable flavors in your finished beer. You should remove as much trub as reasonbly possible by carefully siphoning your wort off of the trub.

maltvault
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Ok

Post by maltvault » Mon May 14, 2001 7:27 am

Trub is a term for the sediment left after the primary is over, it contains yeast, hop/grain dust, and other solids. What you are describing is grain dust, or protien rest if using extract. That has no bearing on the finished beer. AFTER primary though, rack into clean secondary leaving the primary trub behind. If you leave beer in the primary on trub it will cause off flavours.
Good luck,
Malt Vault

birdhunter
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2000 4:55 pm

Almost right.

Post by birdhunter » Mon May 14, 2001 10:00 am

Actually, trub is the result of coagulated proteins produced during the hot and the cold breaks of the boil. These proteins settle to the bottom of the brew pot and combine with the spent hops to collectively make trub. If the trub is introduced into the primary it then settles to the bottom of the fermenter. It is at this point that yeast mixes with the trub. When the beer is transferred to the secondary, trub and yeast are left behind.
My question is how significant is it to remove trub before introducing the boiled wort to the primary fermenter? Commercial breweries remove it, should I also?

maltvault
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most

Post by maltvault » Mon May 14, 2001 1:15 pm

get as much out as you can, i use panithose or a hop bag on the end of my mashing tun spout to catch most. What's left will not hurt your beer unless it's left ontop to long after primary is done. I remove after 7days
Happy Brewing,
Malt Vault

p.s. making Rhinos Oven Roast now.. Think it sound ok? later

birdhunter
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2000 4:55 pm

I use the siphon method.

Post by birdhunter » Mon May 14, 2001 1:29 pm

I don't have a spout on my brew pot so I siphon the wort off the trub. I usually lose about 1/2 to a whole gallon of wort, but I factor that in when formulating the recipe. Thanks for the tips!

birdhunter
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2000 4:55 pm

Sounds tasty!

Post by birdhunter » Mon May 14, 2001 1:31 pm

Oven Roast could almost pass as a Belgian Ale using a Belgian yeast. It will be interesting to see how it turns out.

maltvault
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darker

Post by maltvault » Mon May 14, 2001 2:06 pm

It's got the wort chiller going now. It's higher OG than the calculater said, darker also.. It's about 1.074 and deep amber. Place the hose/hop bag at the end of your hose; you have a spout it's just farther away :-), also leave about 4-5 inches for trapping..

Malt Vault

dartedplus
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Location: Hummelstown, PA, US

I've never had a problem

Post by dartedplus » Wed May 16, 2001 6:13 pm

As far as leaving it in or not, I think that depends on whether or not you want to do the extra work. I usually just dump my wort into the primary, or just through a strainer to get the larger clumps of stuff. I make sure I carefully siphon off into my secondary leaving the trub behind. I also rack twice and find that I get a clearer beer and almost no sediment in the bottles. Good luck

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