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Big Man Stout

Big Man Stout

Oatmeal Stout • All Grain • 25 L

Matthew Jolly

Split batch with half getting wild yeast addition.

April 27, 2017 at 03:55pm

0.0/5.0 0 ratings

Ingredients (All Grain25 L)

  • 6 kg Pale Ale Malt; Bairds Malt

    Pale Ale Malt; Bairds Malt

    Pale Ale malt forms the majority of the grist for a typical U.K. Pale Ale or Bitter beer and is made from some of the best barley available. There is an emphasis on single variety and low protein levels. The barley will be fully steeped and germinated before the green malt is loaded to the kiln. Kilning is a carefully controlled process removing moisture to a relatively low level without destroying excessive amounts of enzymes but imparting characteristic flavour and colour. Even with a diastase of only 45°L there is still enough activity to convert for example 5% of Crystal malt and 5 -10% of cooked adjunct (e.g. flaked maize). Mashing is normally at a fixed temperature of about 65°C, so modification has to be high to cope with this and a coarse grist is normally used. Many UK brewers stress the flavour benefits in the wort and glass of using Pale Ale malts produced from traditional winter malting barley varieties.

  • 1 kg Chocolate Malt; Bairds Malt

    Chocolate Malt; Bairds Malt

    This product is used in the production of Porters and sweet Stouts. The flavour is sharp and somewhat acrid. A great deal of care is needed in the use of this material because of its intense colour and flavour. Manufacture is similar to Amber malt but higher final temperatures are used. Flavour again is due to pyrazines and pyrroles.

  • 0.5 kg Crystal 55; Bairds Malt

    Crystal 55; Bairds Malt

    Crystal or Caramel malts have a distinctive toffee flavour, which becomes more intense as colour is increased, and at the higher end of the colour range burnt or roasted malt flavours may begin to appear. Traditionally in the UK, Crystal malt of colour 70 -80 °ASBC has been used at about 5% of the grist to give the characteristic colour and flavour of UK Bitters and Pale Ales. Adjustment of the amount and/or colour of the Crystal malt may brew some very distinctive beers, but this may require some careful experimentation. Crystal malts have been used in the brewing of Lager beers, but considerable care is required to ensure that whilst a distinctive flavour is achieved, the crystal flavour and colour does not become too dominant. In all beers they can help prevent the formation of oxidised (cardboard) flavours.

  • 0.5 kg Crystal 150; Bairds Malt

    Crystal 150; Bairds Malt

    Crystal or Caramel malts have a distinctive toffee flavour, which becomes more intense as colour is increased, and at the higher end of the colour range burnt or roasted malt flavours may begin to appear. Traditionally in the UK, Crystal malt of colour 70 -80 °ASBC has been used at about 5% of the grist to give the characteristic colour and flavour of UK Bitters and Pale Ales. Adjustment of the amount and/or colour of the Crystal malt may brew some very distinctive beers, but this may require some careful experimentation. Crystal malts have been used in the brewing of Lager beers, but considerable care is required to ensure that whilst a distinctive flavour is achieved, the crystal flavour and colour does not become too dominant. In all beers they can help prevent the formation of oxidised (cardboard) flavours.

  • 0.5 kg Belgian Special B

    Belgian Special B

  • 1 kg Oats Flaked

    Oats Flaked

    Belgian White Ale(wit), other specialty beers.

  • 1 kg Rye Flaked

    Rye Flaked

    Imparts a dry, crisp character. Use in rye beers.

  • 1 kg White Table Sugar (Sucrose)

    White Table Sugar (Sucrose)

    Common household table/baking sugar. Lightens flavor and body of beer. Can contribute a cider-like flavor to the beer if not cold-fermented or used in large quantities.

  • 50 g Columbus - 12.0 AA% whole; boiled 60 min

    Columbus

    Used mainly for bittering with some flavor qualities as well. Aroma is pleasant.

  • 50 g Columbus - 12.0 AA% whole; boiled 15 min

    Columbus

    Used mainly for bittering with some flavor qualities as well. Aroma is pleasant.

  • Fermentis S-04 Safale S-04

    Fermentis S-04 Safale S-04

    A well-known, commercial English ale yeast, selected for its fast fermentation character and its ability to form a very compact sediment at the end of the fermentation, helping to improve beer clarity. This yeast is recommended for the production of a large range of ale beers and is specially well adapted to cask-conditioned ales and fermentation in cylindro-conical tanks. Sedimentation: high. Final gravity: medium. Pitching instructions: Re-hydrate the dry yeast into yeast cream in a stirred vessel prior to pitching. Sprinkle the dry yeast in 10 times its own weight of sterile water or wort at 27C ± 3C. Once the expected weight of dry yeast is reconstituted into cream by this method (this takes about 15 to 30 minutes), maintain a gentle stirring for another 30 minutes. Then pitch the resultant cream into the fermentation vessel. Alternatively, pitch dry yeast directly in the fermentation vessel providing the temperature of the wort is above 20C. Progressively sprinkle the dry yeast into the wort ensuring the yeast covers all the surface of wort available in order to avoid clumps. Leave for 30 minutes and then mix the wort e.g. using aeration.

Style (BJCP)

Category: 16 - Dark British Beer

Subcategory: B - Oatmeal Stout

Range for this Style
Original Gravity: 1.099 1.045 - 1.065
Terminal Gravity: 1.024 1.010 - 1.018
Color: 39.7 SRM 22 - 40
Alcohol: 10.0% ABV 4.2% - 5.9%
Bitterness: 77.3 IBU 25 - 40

Discussion

Matthew Jolly

Good brew day

2017-05-02 8:27am

Brew day went to plan. OG of 1.100. Ferment took off very quickly and seems nearly complete four days later. Smells great.

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