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IMB Rum-Maple Bacon Old Ale

IMB Rum-Maple Bacon Old Ale

Old Ale : All Grain : 5.5 gal

IronMike

Lighter version of Rogue Maple Bacon Ale using Old Ale as a base style and a hint of rum added at bottling. I used thick-sliced Applewood-smoked maple bacon from Sam's Club. The smoked Malt should be 2 lbs Cherrywood smoked Malt and 1/2 lb Weyermanns (BT does not have CW-smoked malt in the database yet)

October 27, 2012 at 06:36am

4.0/5.0 1 rating

Ingredients (All Grain5.5 gal)

  • 8.0 lbs American 2-row

    American 2-row

    Yields a slightly higher extract than Six Rox brewers Malt. Tends to give a smoother, less grainy flavored beer. Some brewers claim they can detect a significant difference in flavor. Lower protein and will yield a lower color than Six-Row Brewers Malt

  • 1.0 lbs Caramel Malt 10L; Briess

    Caramel Malt 10L; Briess

    Candylike sweetness, mild caramel flavor. Characteristics & Applications: • In contrast to Brewers Malt, glassiness is a distinguishing characteristic of Caramel Malt. The glassy endosperm creates the desirable non-fermentable components giving true Caramel Malt the ability to contribute body (mouthfeel), foam, foam retention, and extended beer stability, while contributing color and unique caramel flavor. • Caramel 10L is a roasted caramel malt that imparts golden color. • Use 3-7% for Pilsener-style beers for balance. • Use 5-15% to provide color, sweetness and color to light amber beers. • Produced from AMBA/BMBRI recommended 6-Row Malting Barley varieties.

  • 1.5 lbs Caramel Malt 80L; Briess

    Caramel Malt 80L; Briess

    Pronounced caramel, slight burnt sugar, raisiny, prune flavors. Characteristics & Applications: • In contrast to Brewers Malt, glassiness is a distinguishing characteristic of Caramel Malt. The glassy endosperm creates the desirable non-fermentable components giving true Caramel Malt the ability to contribute body (mouthfeel), foam, foam retention, and extended beer stability, while contributing color and unique caramel flavor. • Caramel Malt 80L is a roasted caramel malt that imparts red to deep red color. • Use 3-15% in Amber and Red beers. • Use 10-15% in Bock beers. • Use 7-15% in Dark beers. • Use 10-15% in Porter and Stout. • Produced from AMBA/BMBRI recommended 6-Row Malting Barley varieties.

  • 3.0 lbs German Dark Munich

    German Dark Munich

    Enhances body and aroma. Stout, schwarzbier, brown ale, dark and amber ales.

  • 2.5 lbs Smoked Malt; Weyermann

    Smoked Malt; Weyermann

    German-grown two-row spring barley (2004 harvest). Product Characteristics: Unique in the world. Initially formulated specifically for the traditional Bamberg Rauchbier (Bamberg Smoked Beer). Can be used for any kind of lager or ale with a complex flavor. Carefully dried over hot, smoky ambers of well-aged beech wood to achieve characteristic smoky flavor, while preserving relatively pale color. Suitable for beers of all strengths, from “regular” to Märzen to Doppelbock. Recommended Quantities: Up to 100% of total grain bill. Suitability (beer styles): Lagers: Bamberg-style Rauchbier, unfiltered barley-based lagers. Ales: Alaskan smoked, Scottish

  • .5 lbs Wheat Malt; Thomas Fawcett

    Wheat Malt; Thomas Fawcett

    Weizens. Improves head retention in all beers. Contributes spicy flavor. Protein rest required.

  • .75 oz Perle - 8.2 AA% pellets; boiled 60 min

    Perle

    Used mainly for its minty bittering and good green hop aromas in all non-pilsener lagersand wheats. Aroma is pleasant and slightly spicy

  • 1.0 oz Sterling - 7.5 AA% pellets; boiled 15 min

    Sterling

    Perceived to be similar to a Saaz and Mt. Hood combination. Finding favor as a Saaz replacement.

  • Fermentis US-05 Safale US-05

    Fermentis US-05 Safale US-05

    The most famous ale yeast strain found across America, now available as a ready-to-pitch dry yeast. Produces well balanced beers with low diacetyl and a very clean, crisp end palate. Sedimentation: low to medium. Final gravity: medium. Pitching instructions: Re-hydrate the dry yeast into yeast cream in a stirred vessel prior to pitching. Sprinkle the dry yeast in 10 times its own weight of sterile water or wort at 27C± 3C(80F ±6F). Once the expected weight of dry yeast is reconstituted into cream by this method (this takes about 15 to 30 minutes), maintain a gentle stirring for another 30 minutes. Then pitch the resultant cream into the fermentation vessel. Alternatively, pitch dry yeast directly in the fermentation vessel providing the temperature of the wort is above 20C(68F). Progressively sprinkle the dry yeast into the wort ensuring the yeast covers all the surface of wort available in order to avoid clumps. Leave for 30 minutes and then mix the wort e.g. using aeration.

Notes

8oz Maple syrup last 15 min 8oz Maple syrup secondary 8 oz Applewood-smoked Maple Bacon baked 15 min @ 350 degrees on parchment, blotted; add bacon to secondary for 2 weeks; add 2-4 oz. Capt Morgan rum to taste at bottling.

Style (BJCP)

Category: 19 - Strong Ale

Subcategory: A - Old Ale

Range for this Style
Original Gravity: 1.073 1.060 - 1.090
Terminal Gravity: 1.017 1.015 - 1.022
Color: 17.3 SRM 10 - 22
Alcohol: 7.3% ABV 6.00% - 9.00%
Bitterness: 34.9 IBU 30.00 - 60.00

Discussion

IronMike

Winner

2013-01-30 9:47pm

This recipe is a keeper. I like this better than the Rogue Voodoo version. Transferred to secondary and "dry hogged". All the color and flavor leached out of bacon strips that floated to the top--pretty gross looking. Small amount of fat clung to glass secondary which turned out to be a benefit by keeping out of the bottling bucket. Primed with Maple Syrup and bottle conditioned. Some notes for the future: Carbonation perfect! Smoke is a bit harsh in the first month, but mellows and blends nicely at 3 months. Need to increase the bacon to 1 lb.

HoW_Brew

Question on Priming Sugar

2014-01-14 8:47am

IronMike, This sounds awesome. I'd love to brew this, but I have a question. Did the syrup you added to secondary last long enough to act as your priming sugar, or did you add more syrup later? If so, how mcuh? Thanks!

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