Aluminum pots

Buying, building and using brewing equipment and apparatus. Product reviews and questions.

Moderator: slothrob

Aluminum pots

Postby Anne » Wed May 26, 2004 11:40 am

It has been stated that using an aluminum pot will ruin the beer. Why?
Anne
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 11:34 am

Controversial

Postby fitz » Wed May 26, 2004 11:50 am

Some Aluminum pots definitley affect the beers flavor. The acid in the wort reacts to the aluminum and creates off flavors. There has even beer studies on health risks.
Now for the good news:
Not all aluminum pots do this shiny aluminum reacts more than dull. The dull normally has a protective oxidized layer on it.
There are threads on this forum that will go into great detail. If you do a search I'm sure you'll find extensive reading. Many of us still use aluminum. I use it for extract batches. I have a very large SS setup from a keg for all grain.
The true test, is if you use it and get metalic or other off flavors, you probably want to discontinue its use.
fitz
Strong Ale
Strong Ale
 
Posts: 442
Joined: Thu Dec 19, 2002 9:36 am

aluminum pots

Postby Anne » Wed May 26, 2004 12:26 pm

Fitz--thank you for your prompt reply. I have been unsuccessful (twice now!) in making beer and am trying to find the root of the problem. I follow the instructions--the batch starts to bubble; but both times it has flatlined after less than 2 days. I add more yeast - nothing. I'm getting discouraged. A
Anne
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 11:34 am

Wait a minute

Postby fitz » Wed May 26, 2004 1:05 pm

Have you checked the gravity of the wort/beer at the "flatlined state" Yeast in warm temps can ferment very rapidly. You may have produced the alcohol from the sugars in two days. It is best to use the lower temp in the yeast temp range, but you can produce beer or alcohol in the high range. Give us some more specifics do you use a hydrometer, have you tasted the beer/wort. Have you trickle fed the beer/wort to see if the yeast are still alive and active(if you don't have a hydrometer)
Give me some more info to go on.
What are you sanitizing with(please don't say bleach)
What temps are you pitching and fermenting at?
fitz
Strong Ale
Strong Ale
 
Posts: 442
Joined: Thu Dec 19, 2002 9:36 am

Complete fermentation in two days.

Postby jeff » Wed May 26, 2004 9:13 pm

Having a complete fermentation in two days is not uncommon especially with lower gravity beers. The gravity reading is a much better indicator of attenuation than duration. Since you indicate that you did see activity, I am inclined to conclude that you may have some beer in that bucket! Measure your gravity; and if you are within range of your target I think you may be ready for the next step. If the gravity is considerably higher than you expect, then there may be another problem.
User avatar
jeff
Imperial Stout
Imperial Stout
 
Posts: 1413
Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2000 9:16 pm
Location: Hollywood, SC

short-bubbling beer

Postby Anne » Thu May 27, 2004 8:08 pm

Hello Fitz,
After my last post, I added another packet of yeast - after dissolving it in warm water (75 degrees) with 2 tsps. of sugar. I let it sit 15 minutes and then stirred it into the batch. Nothing. So I took a hydrometer read - 1.010 -- and tasted the beer: a little bitter, but not bad. So -- should I assume that the fermentation is over and let it sit for two weeks before I bottle? I appreciate your input! I want this to work--Anne
Anne
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 11:34 am

two day fermentation

Postby Anne » Thu May 27, 2004 8:24 pm

Jeff-- thanks for your reply. My H. read was 1.0l and it didn't taste too badly either. The store gave me the impression that it would bubble for nearly a week, which is why I was concerned. Anne
Anne
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 11:34 am

Attenuation

Postby bigdosgood » Fri May 28, 2004 1:04 am

One thing for sure is that there is NO definate rules! I have fermented lagers at room tempurature, then kegged and Lagered with success. I have had OG's of 1.060 ferment in 3 days or 7, you just never know. Sometimes, if using a starter, you get better results, but you just ever know. Keep Sanitation in mind, keep it out of the light, and BEER HAPPENS! Good luck!

David
bigdosgood
Light Lager
Light Lager
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2003 6:48 pm
Location: Somerville, TX, US

Transfer

Postby fitz » Fri May 28, 2004 7:35 am

Anne,
I would transfer to a secondary(another fermenter and let sit at least another week to get most of the yeast out of suspension. Then you can bottle, and let condition. The bitter taste would be from the hops, and some of this may subside after storage. You get some off flavors in what we call green beer, so the flavor will change a little(for the better)
The brew shops will tell you a week, because it may take that long. It doesn't have to take that long. If you try the beer later, and it is still a little bitter for your taste, cut back on the bittering hops the next time. keep tweaking the recipe until you get it the way you like it. Remember to always dosument though. If you start making a few batches, it will be hard to remember what you put in what batch, and what the outcome was. It isn't rocket science, so don't get too freaked out, just enjoy your new hobby.
fitz
Strong Ale
Strong Ale
 
Posts: 442
Joined: Thu Dec 19, 2002 9:36 am

transfer

Postby Anne » Fri May 28, 2004 8:35 am

Fitz--thanks a million for your helpful input. Anne
Anne
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 11:34 am


Return to Equipment

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron