Electric Boiling??

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Electric Boiling??

Postby Shaft42 » Mon Apr 21, 2003 11:12 am

Does anyone have any ideas on how to boil 6+ gallons of wort without the use of gas or propane? I live in a loft (no balcony) and have an electric stove. I have done two 6.5 gallon boils on the electric stove, but it takes forever to boil and the stove has taken a beating from the weight. I was trying to find a submersible heating element (110v) that would be capable of boiling, but have not had much luck. I know there is an item out there that is 220v and is manufactured in the UK (Bruheat or something), but I only have 220v for the stove and dryer. So, I was hoping to not have to pull those out when I want to brew. I want to move to all grain brewing, but this is certainly an obstacle that I need to figure out. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
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Bruheat

Postby Gravity Thrills » Mon Apr 21, 2003 1:56 pm

There is a 110V Bruheat boiler on the market, or at least there was one. A friend had one back in college and it was our first all-grain experience. It was cumbersome enough that after college I continued doing mostly extract for five years, so I only marginally recommend it unless you find one cheap on eBay (I have seen them show up there).

There have been several magazine pieces and lots of online coverage to the topic of using multiple high wattage water heating elements to do the trick, but it is strictly for the hardcore DIY crowd. When I move into a new house and finally have space to put together my dream 1/2-barrel CIP system I'll probably go this route if I find that putting in a exhaust vent to deal with indoor propane or natural gas is too expensive.

And yes, any house I consider moving into must have ample dedicated space for a brewery -- even if my wife doesn't know that's the true underlying plan. Bait and switch, baby.

Cheers,
Jim
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Just build

Postby fitz » Tue Apr 22, 2003 3:53 am

My "addition is bigger than my original house. It also cost just about the same amount. It will all be worth it, I'll have a brewery, and a bar. One room is 10 x 15, and the other is 20 x 20. I think I can live with that. I also get the 3 year old fridge, because it isn't the right color for our new kitchen. Jim, do you need help with the wife negotiations. Make it sound like you are doing it all for her!
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negotiating the wife

Postby Gravity Thrills » Wed Apr 23, 2003 10:41 am

She usually sees through the "it's all for you" bedroom negotiations fairly quickly, but I have better luck in negotiating the brewery. I do have my priorities!
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Bruheat

Postby Shaft42 » Wed Apr 23, 2003 11:50 am

Thanks for the reply. I think that I am going to build my own Bruheat using heating elements for a water heater.
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Turkey Fryer

Postby Jeepboy498 » Thu Apr 24, 2003 8:50 am

Get a turkey fryer, and brew on the sidwalk out in front of your building, or in a parking lot.
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Postby brewmaster808 » Wed Oct 06, 2004 7:02 pm

I think you have similar problems as I did living in a condo. Take a look at my site. You can just change out components to meet your needs.
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cheap solution

Postby johnbc » Wed Feb 23, 2005 12:59 pm

Get a 6+ gallon plastic bucket. Then go down to an appliance repair store and get an old kettle element. They used to make them removeable so you could repair the kettle when the element burnt out. You have the element with a threaded end, a rubber gasket and a large plastic nut. Drill a hole large enough for the element thread and install in the bucket. costs less then $30 (cdn) for the whole kit and it works fine.

the advantage is that the element had a plug adapter built in because it was for a kettle. no fiddling with wires or 220V. It takes about 30 minutes to get to a boil, but I'm cheap and can wait so it works for me.
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