Recipe

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Recipe

Postby Bowhunter » Wed Jan 22, 2003 1:33 pm

On a recent fishing trip in Canada, I tasted what I consider a great beer. I would like to obtain it's recipe for personal use. It is made by Molson Canada and it is called Rickard's Red. It is an Ale and the mash consists of three malts. I know recipes are held in high esteem and sometimes kept secret, but I thought I would try. Thanks Tom B
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History

Postby jayhawk » Wed Jan 22, 2003 4:14 pm

Hey, where were you fishing? I am avid fisherman here in BC. Anyway, Rickards Red is originally from Capilano Brewery, based in North Vancouver, and I believe it is named after EK Rickard, who was a brewmaster at Capilano. It has long since been bought out by Molson, the major brewer up here. Rickards is a good beer, but its been a while since I had any. I would take a stab at this:

Canadian 2 row base malt; maybe a pound of munich malt; 1/2 lb light crystal; and .25 lbs black patent or chocolate for a little red colour. (4 base malts I know, maybe increase the crystal in favour of munich)

As for hops, your guess is as good as mine. I would go for something traditional, not to outlandish...how 'bout Northern Brewer for bittering and Goldings for flavour.

If you can, try "Arctic Red" by Yukon Brewing Co. It is a slightly more aggressive red ale (ie more malty and slightly more hop bitterness & flavour). If you like Rickards, this is a good one to try too.

Try the recipe calculator at this site. You can play around with different formulations till you see something that looks good.

Good luck
Chris
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Fishing

Postby fitz » Fri Jan 24, 2003 9:57 am

I may be taking a trip up there this summer myself to Lake of the woods. I understand there is great muskies up that way!
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Rainbows

Postby jayhawk » Fri Jan 24, 2003 10:17 am

If you ever get the chance, try British Columbia rainbow trout fishing. We have some incredible lakes out here with some amazing fishing. Flyfishing is the norm, but you can also use spinning gear. There is nothing like hooking in to a wild Rainbow trout...the fight is incredible. They must be, pound for pound, one of the toughest fighting fish going.
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Native

Postby fitz » Fri Jan 24, 2003 10:40 am

We have native brook trout, and a little bit of rainbows around here. There is no comparison in fight or flavor between the native and the stocked trout I have to agree. I like the power of the muskies though, and the feirceness. Smallmouth are a great fish too. I'd like to come to BC sometime for some hunting also.
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Pike = muskies?

Postby jayhawk » Fri Jan 24, 2003 12:16 pm

Are muskies the same as northern pike? I did some pike fishing up in the Yukon and man, are they an intense fish. They seem almost prehistoric, and the way they attack the lure is incredible. Don't think I would want to eat them though.
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Similar

Postby dartedplus » Sat Jan 25, 2003 10:41 am

They are somewhat similar in shape and appearance, though the muskies tend to get a little fatter and bigger. They are also a little more ferocious looking.
As far as pike go, they are also very similar to pickerel, they are edible and from what I've been told the meat is a little sweeter than your normal fish. A little boney though.
I'm sure they would go well with a nice homebrew!!!

Ed
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Pikes' place...

Postby Gravity Thrills » Mon Jan 27, 2003 6:42 am

Yeah! I get to use some of my mostly useless day job knowledge to answer a question on my dream job web forum...

The muskie, more formally referred to as muskellunge, is a member of the same genus as northern pike. The scientific name of the muskie is Esox masquinongy, and northern pike is Esox lucius. Both of these belong to the "true pike" family, the Esocidae. This distinguishes them from walleye "pike" which is not actually a pike at all but a perch (the two separate dorsal fins on the walleye versus the one dorsal fin set way back on the true pikes). Chain pickerel (Esox niger) is another congener to northern and muskie. Several northern and midwest states also stock a fish called the "Tiger muskie", that is actually a hybrid between northern pike and muskie.

From what I recall from my fishing days some 20 years ago, muskie and northerns usually both feel more like snags than fish when they hit a hook - lots of dead weight and not much active fight until they catch site of the boat. Northern are quite edible, but are indeed bonier than walleye.

The best walleye I have ever eaten was at the Great Lakes Brewing Company brewpub in Cleveland, with several of their Dortmunder Golds to wash it down.

Cheers,
Jim (The Former Fishin' Musician, now the Underpaid Biologist)
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Re: History

Postby FrostyTheBeerman » Tue Nov 01, 2005 11:39 pm

Hi Chris,

Interesting stuff. Old post, I know but new for me :wink:

I was on Molson or Labatt's site tonight, and they say 3 malts, however I found that you and another person on the net said it was 4 base malts, - that's interesting... I wonder if Labatt decided to change the recipe, as they say it's made with 3 base malts.... perhaps it's 3 or was 4 and they modified it... hmm, puzzling but interesting.

I am hoping to get a nice red tint to a beer this week, last year I made a "Santa Ale" and wanted it to be red, but it didn't turn out so red.... and I used a bit of roasted barley.

Is there any tried and true ratio of roasted barly to 2 row that is a perfect Rickard's red tint ?

Thanks in advance for any info.

Frosty
jayhawk wrote:Canadian 2 row base malt; maybe a pound of munich malt; 1/2 lb light crystal; and .25 lbs black patent or chocolate for a little red colour. (4 base malts I know, maybe increase the crystal in favour of munich)

Chris
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