Dry Beer?

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Dry Beer?

Postby BobbyK » Mon Dec 02, 2002 12:27 pm

When I was a pup many years ago, there were zillions of independent breweries in the N.E. and some of those brews had a "dry" aftertaste. I can't put any other name or description to it. Similar to the aftertaste on the back of the tongue when you drink a nice dry cabernet.

If I'm not totally nuts and someone out there can actually figure out what I'm trying to describe, what can I add to what style of beer to create that 'dry' aftertaste? I believe the originals were ales, but perhaps a lager or two.
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Adjuncts

Postby jayhawk » Mon Dec 02, 2002 12:57 pm

The beers probably had adjuncts like rice and corn in them. These add fermentables but impart little flavour or sweetness, helping bring about a lighter, drier taste (especially rice). Lots of mainstream commercial beers are heavy adjunct brewers. For extract brewing you can use rice and corn syrup. I know of one semi major Canadian brewery that uses syrups. For all grain you can flaked corn and rice or do a more complex cereal mash. This process has been outlined by 'Thrills in a previous post. Search the archives if you want to see it.
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Sour Mashing or Hops?

Postby Push Eject » Mon Dec 02, 2002 3:55 pm

Assuming the dryness you remember wasn't related to a low-bodied or highly hopped beer perhaps you experienced the joys of a soured mash.

To the first point, you can thin your mouthfeel out by mashing at a slightly lower temperature -- this will produce a beer with higher alcohol content and less body than the same mash at a higher temperature.

On the other hand, that bitter bite might have been a sour mash; that is a portion of your mash left to sour for, say, 14 hours. It will start to smell really bad, but go with it and blend it with your standard mash into your kettle and brew as normal.

Guiness, I believe, achieves it's dry bite this way.

Cheers!
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Experience?

Postby jayhawk » Mon Dec 02, 2002 5:19 pm

Sounds interesting. Have you ever tried this? Do you have a recipe? What proportion of mash do you sour?
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Links

Postby Push Eject » Mon Dec 02, 2002 7:35 pm

There have been some brief discussions here -- a search for "sour" turns up good results.

Here are links to 2 recipes for your perusal:
http://www.stoutbillys.com/stout/recipens/(Flat)/0F1F55BE.htm

http://www.skotrat.com/skotrat/recipes/ ... es/17.html

No fear! Jump on in and try it -- just be sure and let us know how it goes.

Cheers!
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My Goodness!

Postby Gravity Thrills » Tue Dec 03, 2002 7:46 am

To the best of my knowledge, Guiness uses partial-wort souring and not a sour mash to get that trademark tang. I think Papazian and others have estimated the soured wort to be around 2% of the entire wort volume, and I have used this amount with good results. Usually i just pour a couple of pints of commercial Guiness, cover with cheesecloth and put them in a closet for 2 days. The aroma of the flat, spoiled beer is completely reminiscent of a frat house basement the day after a keg party. When you add this to your boiling wort it will kill off any microbeasties and add that little bit of tang to your stout. Beamish and Murphy's don't do this, and a side-by-side tasting of Guiness and one of the others allows a good sensory evaluation of the subtle sour component in Guinness.

I have also seen full wort souring described as a way to get the sour flavor characteristic desired in Flemmish brown ales and pseudo-lambics. Conduct your kettle boil as usual, but then run the wort to a fermenter (preferably a bucket not a carboy, since you want to maximize exposed surface area), cover with cheesecloth without pitching yeast and put in a dark closet for 1-2 days depending on the degree of sourness desired. Then put the soured wort back into the kettle and boil for 15-20 minutes to pasteurize, run it to your fermenter, cool, pitch, and ferment. I have yet to try it, but I like the partial wort souring for dry stouts and with some trial and error this could produce some interesting beers.

Cheers,
Jim
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Not Hops, for sure

Postby BobbyK » Tue Dec 03, 2002 11:12 am

Based on everything I've seen here, I'm betting is was some sort of adjunct. I guess I'll do a little experimenting.
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One word...Rheingold!

Postby Brewer2001 » Tue Dec 03, 2002 2:14 pm

Bobby,

Rheingold (not sure of spelling) was cotton in a can! It was a light lager that had a large addition of corn added as a adjunct part of the mash. I am not sure of the mash regiment or the type of yeast or hops that were used. It was dust dry and tangy. That would be one to model if you wanted to recreate this style. I will keep checking.

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That's the one...

Postby BobbyK » Wed Dec 04, 2002 6:47 am

Rheingold was my favorite daily drinker back in the old days. I was really sorry to see them go. They knew what they had because if you remember one of their jingles was, "My beer is Rheingold, the dry beer!"
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