First recipe

Grains, malts, hops, yeast, water and other ingredients used to brew. Recipe reviews and suggestions.

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First recipe

Postby Remy62 » Tue Jan 17, 2017 10:43 am

After having tried to document as much as possible I developed my first prescription in the Belgian Blond Ale style. Of course I am my first experience I avoided dare and the only concession that I was allowed in the choice of an Anglo-Saxon hops.
I'd love to read your comments on the recipe, you find it balanced? Reflects the style chosen? What would you change you / would you add ?? Thanks in advance to those who want to help

OG: 1071
FG: 1018
ABV: 7.1
IBU: 19.1
EBC: 7
Plato: 17.3
Gal: 6.07
Eff.: 100%

Grain:
6.61 lbs Extract Liquid Light
1.10 lbs Extract Dry Light
1.10 lbs Candi Sugar Clear
0.55 lbs Belgian Aromatic
0.55 lbs Belgian Biscuit

Hope:
1.6 oz E. K. Golding (F) boiled 60 m.
0.3 oz E. K. Golding (F) boiled 15 m.
0.18 oz E. K. Golding (F) Dry Hopping
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Re: First recipe

Postby slothrob » Mon Jan 23, 2017 6:39 am

I do not know much about recipes for the style. However, i believe that aromatic and biscuit malts both need to be mashed, or you will have unconverted starch in your beer, which may leave it cloudy.
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Re: First recipe

Postby Remy62 » Thu Feb 02, 2017 1:25 pm

Of course the aromatic and biscuit grains will be first ground and then put into infusion can expect to 30 m with the grain bag while maintaining the temperature between 65 ° and 70 °
Hi
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Re: First recipe

Postby slothrob » Fri Feb 03, 2017 7:50 am

Remy62 wrote:Of course the aromatic and biscuit grains will be first ground and then put into infusion can expect to 30 m with the grain bag while maintaining the temperature between 65 ° and 70 °
Hi

That should help. There is some weak enzyme activity in those malts, so there is the potential for the starches to be converted to fermentable sugars at 65-70°C. Since the enzyme activity is low, I would consider soaking the grain for 60 min. and keeping the water volume at about 2 qt/pound or 4 L/kg. A small amount of base malt would increase the enzyme content quite a bit.
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