Chilling Down Wort

Brewing processes and methods. How to brew using extract, partial or all-grain. Tips and tricks.

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Chilling Down Wort

Postby Rfields947 » Wed Nov 23, 2011 8:19 pm

If I skip the step of chilling down the wort and pour it straight into the fermentation jug and add yeast, will this cause and problems with the beer?
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Postby bobcat_brewer » Thu Nov 24, 2011 10:48 am

You will kill your yeast.
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Postby Rfields947 » Thu Nov 24, 2011 11:26 am

Not exactly what I wanted to hear.
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not chilling

Postby slothrob » Thu Nov 24, 2011 11:37 am

If you are talking about wort close to boiling temperature, it will kill the yeast and might melt a plastic bucket or shatter a glass carboy fermenter.

If you are talking about wort that is hot but below 100°F, the yeast will survive, but it will create a lot of off flavors, that will adversely affect the flavor of the beer, and fusel alcohols that will cause severe hangovers.

For ale yeast, you usually want the wort to be between 60 and 68°F when pitched, for the best flavors. Lagers will probably be best if the yeast is pitched at 45-50°F.

There is a relatively uncommon technique that you might find easier, if chilling is a problem for you. It is called the no-chill method. It still involves cooling the wort, but instead of using an immersion or counter-flow chiller, the kettle is simply covered and put in the coolest spot available. The next day, the wort should be down to pitching temperature and can be transferred to the fermenter.

There is increased risk of contamination and the potential for an off flavor caused by DMS, but many people use this technique successfully. DMS is generally an insignificant risk for beers without a large amount of Pilsner malt, especially if they are well-boiled.
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Postby Rfields947 » Thu Nov 24, 2011 12:11 pm

Thanks Rob.
The beer is still in the carboy fermenter. The bubbles have slowed down considerably in 6 days. Thought they would be through by now, but I am patient and will let it sit for another week if I have to. On the next batch I will make sure I have the wort at or around 60 to 68 degrees before I pour into the carboy.
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