cold brewing

Brewing processes and methods. How to brew using extract, partial or all-grain. Tips and tricks.

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cold brewing

Postby spgriffin » Tue Dec 07, 2010 1:35 pm

is there such a thing? Instead of heating water to 150-whatever can I put grains (specialty for extract or entire grain bill if AG) in cold water to extract overnight?
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Postby jawbox » Wed Dec 08, 2010 8:45 pm

I don't think so as enzymes are active at the warmer temps good average for beta and alpha amylase being around the 150°F temp.
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cold brewing

Postby slothrob » Thu Dec 09, 2010 7:52 am

The enzymes would still be active, but much slower, but the starch gelatinization temperature is up around 150F, so the remaining activity of these enzymes would be even less effective. I don't know how much less, however.

That might be fine if you let it go longer, but there are other activities that would continue at a lower temperature. One problem might be some issues with proteinases and glucanase working to make the beer seem thin. The primary concern I can think of, however, is that bacteria would grow at low temperatures and with longer mashes. Perhaps you might manage to convert enough sugar to make a Berliner Weisse if you tried mashing cool (120F or less?) for a few days or more, but I wouldn't try it on anything that you didn't want to be sour.
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Specialty Grains

Postby brewmeisterintng » Fri Dec 10, 2010 6:35 pm

I think that the majority of specialty grains don't require conversion. That would require a mini mash. I do agree with bacteria and spoilable.
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cold extrraction

Postby slothrob » Fri Dec 10, 2010 7:58 pm

I was only taking about mashing, not steeping. A lot of people steep roasted malts cold to minimize the roasted flavor extraction.
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