How do I get a strong Caramel flavour in my brown ale

Brewing processes and methods. How to brew using extract, partial or all-grain. Tips and tricks.

Moderator: slothrob

How do I get a strong Caramel flavour in my brown ale

Postby jdiddy » Mon Sep 08, 2008 7:12 am

A friend of mine recently took me to a DuClaw brewery and tried their beer, Euphoria. I originally thought it was a bit sweet, but I've had it a few times since then and it's grown on me. I was looking for a way to get the caramel flavour in my brown ale. I've tried different crystal malts, yeasts, and even caramels in the secondary, but no luck. Does anyone have any advice, tips????
jdiddy
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Sep 08, 2008 6:59 am

Crystal Malt

Postby Legman » Mon Sep 08, 2008 7:36 pm

You should be able to get a nice caramel flavor from some of the darker crystal malts like, 90L, 120L or 200L.
It also depends on the amount your using too. I normally use a pound to a pound and a half in most of my darker beers. They always have a good caramel flavor to them. You could even use more if you like.

Another thing you might try is molasses or treacle. I brew frequently with those and they add a nice caramel-like flavor, but it's different. A half a pound will produce a noticeable flavor without overpowering the malts.

Hope that helps.
User avatar
Legman
Strong Ale
Strong Ale
 
Posts: 349
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2007 9:02 pm
Location: North Carolina

Postby krussader » Wed Dec 03, 2008 1:30 pm

You could also try adding a couple pounds of caramel malt to the pot instead of your base malt. It gives it a really nice colour as well.
krussader
Light Lager
Light Lager
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Apr 25, 2008 9:59 pm

Postby brewin2me » Wed Apr 01, 2009 9:35 pm

boil longer. I made an old ale with marris otter for the only malt with a 2.5 hour boil and it came out with a pronounced caramel flavor
brewin2me
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Mar 31, 2009 6:13 pm
Location: minnesota/wisconsin

Postby spgriffin » Thu Apr 30, 2009 8:34 pm

You may want to experiment with Briess' Extra Special mlt, which is caramelly and in high doses hints of raisin.
spgriffin
Pale Ale
Pale Ale
 
Posts: 57
Joined: Wed Mar 18, 2009 8:49 am
Location: Chicago

Postby ddddyyyyy » Thu Jun 18, 2009 3:24 am

I agree with jdiddy
ddddyyyyy
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jun 17, 2009 4:45 am

Caramel Flavor

Postby spgriffin » Mon Jan 18, 2010 4:15 pm

This will depend on how much sweetness you really want to drink. Lower caramel/crystal malts in high quantity provide very good caramel flavor. The higher caramel "L" you go, say 120 and up the more it will resemble stoned fruit than actual simple sweetness. Extra Special is a great grain to use, but it can have a raisiny flavor good for really dark beers and some Belgians. But I wouldn't call it caramel in its flavor. If you want a light color with sweet flavor, try Caramel 10, Honey Malt, or Victory with up to a pound -at least 6 ounces though.
Keg 1: Rye stout
Keg 2: Irish honey red
spgriffin
Pale Ale
Pale Ale
 
Posts: 57
Joined: Wed Mar 18, 2009 8:49 am
Location: Chicago

caramel flavor

Postby stan » Wed Apr 28, 2010 5:49 pm

Another technique is to boil down some of the first runnings till it gets thick and starts to darken from carmelization. Then add this back to the main wort. I usually do this in a separate pot, so as not to lengthen the total boil time. Kettle carmelization adds a slightly different flavor than caramel malts.

Stan
stan
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Apr 28, 2010 5:44 pm
Location: San Diego, CA


Return to Techniques, Methods, Tips & How To

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 3 guests

cron