steel cut oats

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steel cut oats

Postby spgriffin » Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:11 pm

If I want to use McCann's Irish Steel Cut Oats, what do I do with them? Do I bake them first? Boil day before? Treat them like Flaked Oats and simply add them with the grain bill?
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oats

Postby slothrob » Wed Jun 03, 2009 6:47 am

I don't believe these are "quick" oats, so they're not gelatinized, so you should do a cereal mash. This involves mixing them with some base malt (about 3:1 oats:malt) in about 1 gallon water for every 1/2 pound, heating them to mash temperatures, mashing them for about 15-20 minutes, then boiling them for 45 minutes or more with frequent stirring. You should see a change to a thinner consistency when it is done. Then they can be added to the tun and mashed along with the rest of the grain.
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Steel Cut Oats

Postby spgriffin » Wed Jun 03, 2009 8:44 am

What would the difference be if they were quick oats?
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Re: Steel Cut Oats

Postby twarin » Wed Jun 03, 2009 12:54 pm

spgriffin wrote:What would the difference be if they were quick oats?


If they are "quick" oats, then you can mash them along with the rest of your grains. If they are already gelatinized (as quick oats are), then the starches are easily accessible to the enzymes.

Of course, you will lose some flavor by using quick oats.
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oats

Postby slothrob » Wed Jun 03, 2009 3:54 pm

I've done it both ways, the cereal mash and the quick oats. I can't say that I was able to discern a flavor difference between the 2 methods through the strong roasted flavors of the stout. I've done a cereal mash for a Cream Ale, as well, and even that was hard to say.

It's great to try these techniques, but I think a stronger flavored Base Malt, like Maris Otter Pale Malt makes a more significant flavor difference. Also. a touch of Melanoidin, Aromatic, Munich, Vienna, toasted or Amber Malt can make up for any lost melanoidins from the lack of a cereal mash for much less effort.
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quick oats

Postby spgriffin » Wed Jun 03, 2009 5:36 pm

To beat a dead horse, is this a quick oat? and if so, a good one to use?

http://www.mccanns.ie/p_QuickEasy.html
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quick oats

Postby slothrob » Wed Jun 03, 2009 6:21 pm

They look like quick oats all right.
I'm sure they're fine. I used Quaker only because that's what we had in the pantry.
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