60 or 90 min. mash?

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60 or 90 min. mash?

Postby Legman » Mon Dec 15, 2008 1:03 pm

I keep seeing where some are doing 90 min. mash times instead of the usual 60.
When and where would this be used? And what effects does this have on the mash? Increased efficiency?
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RE: 60 or 90 min. mash?

Postby wottaguy » Mon Dec 15, 2008 1:49 pm

Well...for me i've found that it seems to be dependant on what type of malt i'm mashing. I have found that pilsner malts, Wyerman especially, do need the extra time to convert. I usually have to hold them for 90 minutes. When mashing ale malts, i start checking for conversion after 45 minutes, then every 10 minutes afterwards until i'm satisfied that conversion has completed. Another reason to mash longer is if you're using 6 row malt. I also tend to mash for 90 minutes if making a stout.

I have recently brewed a Blonde Ale of which I blended 60% 2-row with 35% pilsner malt and the remaining being crystal 20L. I found that the pilsner malt seemed to convert faster due to the introduction of the 2-row. Perhaps the 2-row has more enzymatic potential? Just a guess here about that. Anyways, it did make a really fine tasting blonde ale.

Would anyone else have any comments regarding this question?

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Mash timing

Postby mikfir » Fri Jan 16, 2009 3:33 pm

I have found that we all should stop paying any attention to mash times in recipes. I have been brewing for over 40 years and have found that mashing is a natural process that will take place at its own pace. Checking for conversion using iodine is the only way to know if you have fully converted. I typically mash 2 1/2 to 3 hours and have routinely acheived 80 to 82% efficiency with a consquent reduction in my grain bills. There are those who will vehemently disagree with me, but my beers keep winning awards, so I'll keep doing it my way.
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mash temp

Postby shaggyt » Sat Jan 17, 2009 8:32 pm

wottaguy...when mashing the Weyerman's pils malts, what temp are you using for 90 minutes?
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mash temp

Postby wottaguy » Tue Jan 20, 2009 10:20 am

shaggyt,

When I was using Weyerman's pils malt, it would be for a lager of which I would mash at 148 deg F. I found it usually took 90 to 105 minutes for conversion. I have since discontinued this brand of Pils malt in favor of Durst malt and conversion is taking less time, an hour to an hour 15 or so. I have also started to blend (50/50) the pils malt with either an american 2-row like Rahr or Great Western or even with Malteries Franco Belges, (which I highly recommend), and found that conversion usually takes an hour to complete.

All in all what ever time it takes to convert must be the correct time I would think.

These are just my observations using my system and you may have different results.

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