Partial Mash Help

Brewing processes and methods. How to brew using extract, partial or all-grain. Tips and tricks.

Moderator: slothrob

Partial Mash Help

Postby Legman » Sat Mar 08, 2008 2:15 pm

I recently did my first partial mash. I did some research and found a variety of different ways to do this. Not really knowing what was best, I chose to do a multi-step mash as stated in John Palmer's- How to brew. I mashed grains @ 104 - 140 - 158
Last edited by Legman on Sat Mar 08, 2008 10:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Legman
Strong Ale
Strong Ale
 
Posts: 349
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2007 9:02 pm
Location: North Carolina

Postby slothrob » Sat Mar 08, 2008 3:50 pm

There are a number of reasons that one might choose a particular multi-step mash, but for most modern malts they are really unnecessary.

I'd say you are mostly just complicating your brewday, especially with a partial mash, where the mash only supplies a fraction of your fermentables.

That mash range of 153-158 is a bit high, though. I'd only use that high a mash temperature for a beer that had a very low OG, like an Ordinary Bitter or a Mild. For a typical all-grain beer I choose a 148-152
BTP v2.0.* Windows XP
User avatar
slothrob
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 1769
Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2006 1:36 pm
Location: Greater Boston

Postby Legman » Sat Mar 08, 2008 5:12 pm

You say "most modern malts" don't need the multi-step mash, so which malts would require that? I'm guessing unmalted grains would be one of those.

Are your mash times at those temps still 60 mins. also?

Seems to be a huge fudge factor in what everyone thinks about this.
User avatar
Legman
Strong Ale
Strong Ale
 
Posts: 349
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2007 9:02 pm
Location: North Carolina

Postby slothrob » Sun Mar 09, 2008 8:52 am

Intentionally undermodified German Pilsner Malt is the classic example of a "non-modern" malt, that would be best served by a step mash.

Recipes that are high in wheat malt can benefit from a Protein Rest, especially if you want a clear beer.

Unmalted grains often benefit from a Cereal Mash or a Beta-Glucan Rest, if you're getting a gooey mess of a mash.

I'm not sure how much difference the temperature ranges will create, as I don't usually use step mashes of that type. When I do use this method, I use 146
BTP v2.0.* Windows XP
User avatar
slothrob
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 1769
Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2006 1:36 pm
Location: Greater Boston


Return to Techniques, Methods, Tips & How To

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 2 guests