how can I control the terminal gravity?

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how can I control the terminal gravity?

Postby bfabre » Sat Jan 05, 2008 10:00 pm

I brewed a porter that said, according to the "Beer Tools Pro" to be at 1.016 and the reading i got was 1.026. What can I do to control the readings to co-en-side to the receipe? Any assistance would help.
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Final Gravity

Postby brewmeisterintng » Sat Jan 05, 2008 10:19 pm

There are a lot of things that effect your final gravity. Software is designed to predict how much is going to ferment out based on your grains and yeast. If you mash at a higher temp you will have more non-fermentables in your wort. You could have a weak yeast that just peters out before it's time. You could have had a temp drop which sent your yeast into dormancy.
I have had some of these problems and now have consistant practices as well as I always have a yeast starter to ensure that there enough viable yeast ready to do their job. It is easier to eliminate the potential problem on the front side than try trouble shooting after the fact. Hope this helps .
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Re: Final Gravity

Postby bfabre » Sat Jan 05, 2008 10:42 pm

I mash between 158 and 160 degrees and am pretty consistant on the temp for fermentation.
The temp down in the basement only varies between 68-70 degrees.
It might just be the yeast?
I have not yet tried a yeast starter yet but, it just might be time to begin!!
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Temp may be High

Postby brewmeisterintng » Sun Jan 06, 2008 9:20 am

As a rule I batch mash @ 153 degrees. The higher the mash temp the sweeter the beer. There will be more non-fermetnables that will make it into the wort and into the final beer. It's not a bad thing is you are looking for a nice sweet brown ale or stout but not so nice in an IPA. I don't bottle any more (kegging rocks) and am not so concerned about the final gravity. I know that providing the proper temperature and enough healthy yeast, I am guaranteed a full fermentation process. I always primary for one week and secondary for two. My primary is usually finished within the first 3-4 days but I let it sit the whole week... it's just easier that way.
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Postby bfabre » Sun Jan 06, 2008 1:55 pm

153 degrees might help. I seems we both have the same technique with the primary and the secondary.
Yes I have kegged a couple of times too. It does cut down time on the process. But as for now I do not have the any place to keep it cold. I need a regulator too. All I have is the hand held preasure inducer doodad. Thanks for the advice with the temps it makes sence.
Brian
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Postby bfabre » Sun Jan 06, 2008 1:58 pm

Oh, one more thing. Under your name it lists you as a "Tripple" what does that mean? Also how do you get a picture pasted?
"B"
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Questions Answered

Postby brewmeisterintng » Sun Jan 06, 2008 3:56 pm

B,
The word "Triple" is a rank associated with the number of posts I have made over the years. The hop picture is a little pic that I placed in my profile when I set up my account. The picture has size limitations.
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Re: Final Gravity

Postby slothrob » Sun Jan 06, 2008 7:28 pm

bfabre wrote:I mash between 158 and 160 degrees.

Not to downplay the benefit of a starter, but your mash temperature is your problem. Giving us rough idea of your recipe, your starting gravity, and the yeast that you're using can help us give you more specific advice.

160
BTP v2.0.* Windows XP
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Thanks Guys

Postby bfabre » Sun Jan 06, 2008 9:09 pm

Thanks guys, I will adjust my temps accordingly.
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