Tips For Fermintation

Brewing processes and methods. How to brew using extract, partial or all-grain. Tips and tricks.

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Tips For Fermintation

Postby mackdjroc187 » Sun Oct 14, 2007 11:48 pm

Hi I am going to attempt my first brew sometime this week. I live in the Tampa Bay area and would like to know of any tips on keeping my primary fermenter cool during the fermentation process. The recipe is a Sierra Nevada clone kit. The ingredients are 6 lbs of light malt extract, 1 lb. of Specialty grains, 2 oz Perle bittering hops, 2 oz Cascade aroma hops, Munton's 6 gm dry yeast. My place is pretty warm, around 78 degrees most of the time. I could probably turn the air down to 75 for a week or so. I was also thinking of a cooler with a ice block in the bottom with carboy on top and just change it out every day? What do most brewers do in high temp areas without basements? I am starting to worry I might have to postpone my brew till this winter when it cools down outside. Thanks for any suggestions... Also I was thinking about a secondary fermentation since the recipe recommended a "2 stage fermentation", but most of the threads I have been reading have stated that an extended time in the primary fermenter is just as good. Is this the case b/c it makes sense to me. Would that be ok in a plastic fermentation bucket or should I buy the glass carboy? Aprox how long should I let it stay in for a extended fermentation?
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Postby brewer13210 » Mon Oct 15, 2007 9:27 am

Mack,

78F is pretty warm. You can still brew and ferment it at that temperature, but the yeast will produce more fusel alcohols and more esters. Even up here in the north (NY), fall tends to be the start of brewing season.

There are all sorts of tricks to keeping the fermentor cool. One effective method is to wrap the fermentor with a wet towel (usually placed in a shallow pan of water, and let evaporative cooling keep the fermentor cool.

As for aging, you'll get better results by racking/transferring your beer to a secondary fermentor after the primary ferment is done. After primary fermentation, the cell walls of the yeast that has settled to the bottom of the fermentor will start to break down, which can product some off flavors, and that process will be a bit quicker at elevated temperatures.

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Cooling and secondary

Postby slothrob » Mon Oct 15, 2007 10:32 am

I'd think that wrapping the fermentor in a wet towel or t-shirt, with the end down in a bucket of water (also called a swamp cooler), would get you quite a bit of evaporative cooling if there was an airconditioner nearby. I know some people who freeze water in soda bottles and swap those out every day. Another approach is to stick the fermentor in a temperature-controlled fridge or freezer. A cheaper alternative is to find an old dorm fridge, open or remove the door, then build an insulated box around the fermentor and fridge.

I've used the swamp cooler method to get fermentation temperratures about 5
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Postby mackdjroc187 » Mon Oct 15, 2007 10:22 pm

Thanks for the tips. I think I am going to do a half batch 2.5 gallons and tried a couple frozen soda bottles in a small rubber maid of water. Has anyone try the Party Pig? I have read some of the post about the smaller kegging systems and it sounds like they bulge or have carbonation issues. I haven't seen anything written about this system. http://www.midwestsupplies.com/products ... rodID=4909
Let me know what you guys think. Time for me to start workin on getting some empties for bottling day.
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