Mash today brew tomorrow

Brewing processes and methods. How to brew using extract, partial or all-grain. Tips and tricks.

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Mash today brew tomorrow

Postby brewmeisterintng » Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:29 am

I am asking this question because in all my reading I have never come accross this topic. My buddy called me last night and told me that he had just mashed out an all grain but didn't have time to do the boil until today and wanted to know if it would hurt to leave the wort for 24 hours before boiling. I told him that he may get some wild yeast/ bacteria in there but that should be killed off in the boil. I am just looking for others opinions. I know that I usually block out enough time to finish my brew if I am going to start a batch, it's just good practice.
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Postby brewer13210 » Tue Jun 05, 2007 9:09 am

There can be a problem with a 24 hour lag between mashing and boiling. If there are any bugs in the mash runoff, they'll have the better part of the day to start producing things like lactic and acetic acid...which boiling after the fact won't fix.

I would have at least boiled it long enough to sanitize the wort before letting it set.

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It's a stout

Postby brewmeisterintng » Tue Jun 05, 2007 6:00 pm

I forgot to mention that he is brewing a Guiness clone. I do hope that he doesn't let it go more than a day or he may have just wasted time, money and BEEER.
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oh, a GUINESS clone

Postby slothrob » Tue Jun 05, 2007 6:19 pm

Well, for a Guiness clone, a bit of a lactic acid twang might make it closer to the real thing. For any other beer, I probably would have recommended bringing the wort up to boiling temperature briefly to insure Pasteurization, before leaving it overnight, covered.

Acetic acid is actually quite volatile. We use it as a buffer in the lab when we want to be able to later remove the salt by evaporation. A lot of it will blow off during the boil. I just don't know how much.
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Closing the book on this one

Postby brewmeisterintng » Fri Jun 08, 2007 5:41 pm

My buddy waited two days and by then it was TOO late. he had growth already starting to form however, he did try to boil it but the smell was BAD.
I think that there is a lesson to be learned here.
If your going to brew, brew or wait until you have enough time to make the batch. :oops:
I hope that this post give light to those who might try this technique.
Save your money and grains... wild yeast and bacteria will ruin your day and batch.
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