What should I pay to gain professional brewing experience?

General brewing information, questions and discussion. Topics that do not seem to fit elsewhere.

Moderators: slothrob, 2row, wottaguy

What should I pay to gain professional brewing experience?

Postby Indian » Fri Nov 03, 2006 9:38 pm

Next week I am to meet with a local professional brewer as I am a home brewer interested in gaining professional brewing experience in the production of Pilsner
Indian
Light Lager
Light Lager
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2006 11:19 pm
Location: Viet Nam

Postby brewer13210 » Sat Nov 04, 2006 8:05 am

What kind of brewing job are you looking for? If you're looking for a job at one of the major brewers, then you're going to need much more than an apprenticeship in order to be hired as a brewer...a technical background will be essential.

Likewise, if you're looking for a job in a microbrewery or brewpub, and apprentice at a regional or national brewery, then you'll still have major gaps in your education, as the brew systems in small and major breweries are very different from each other.

If you're just trying to become a better home brewer, then I wouldn't pay anyone anything. There are plenty of books out there that will help develop your brewing skills, and there are plenty of good brew clubs.

How is it that you have money to pay for an acquaintanceship, but not money for school?

As for what you should pay, that will depend on the local wage scale, and how much work/how much teaching you are getting.

Todd
brewer13210
Pale Ale
Pale Ale
 
Posts: 79
Joined: Wed Oct 25, 2006 12:06 pm
Location: La Fayette, NY, USA

what should an apprentice know?

Postby Indian » Sun Nov 05, 2006 9:16 pm

Todd thanks for the interesting guidance,

1. I do not seek employment.
What kind of brewing job are you looking for? If you're looking for a job at one of the major brewers, then you're going to need much more than an apprenticeship in order to be hired as a brewer...a technical background will be essential.

Likewise, if you're looking for a job in a microbrewery or brewpub, and apprentice at a regional or national brewery, then you'll still have major gaps in your education, as the brew systems in small and major breweries are very different from each other.

2. I want some experience before I attend a formal setting of a brew school abroad.
If you're just trying to become a better home brewer, then I wouldn't pay anyone anything. There are plenty of books out there that will help develop your brewing skills, and there are plenty of good brew clubs.
3. I am starting to get into reading about brewing a lot more as there are no formal schools or brew clubs in the Asia region in which I live.

How is it that you have money to pay for an acquaintanceship, but not money for school?

As for what you should pay, that will depend on the local wage scale, and how much work/how much teaching you are getting.

4. I guess I should rephrase my questions to: What a very basic formal education would entail and at best what should every apprentice know?

Todd
Indian
Light Lager
Light Lager
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2006 11:19 pm
Location: Viet Nam

Re: what should an apprentice know?

Postby brewer13210 » Mon Nov 06, 2006 8:30 am

Indian wrote:Todd thanks for the interesting guidance,

1. I do not seek employment.

2. I want some experience before I attend a formal setting of a brew school abroad.

3. I am starting to get into reading about brewing a lot more as there are no formal schools or brew clubs in the Asia region in which I live.

4. I guess I should rephrase my questions to: What a very basic formal education would entail and at best what should every apprentice know?


As general topics, a basic education should include water chemestry, recipe formulation, brewhouse microbiology, sanitation, packaging, sensory evaluation. I like the books by George Fix: "An Analysis of Brewing Techniques" and Principles of Brewing Science", and Gregory Noonan's "New Brewing Lager Beer". All three are concise and inexpensive. Formal brewing textbooks are very expensive.

I would also encourage you to check out the BJCP web site, and especially the materials on passing the BJCP exam. Even if you don't have any intention of taking the test, there is a wealth of information in the study guide.
http://www.bjcp.org/index.php

Todd
brewer13210
Pale Ale
Pale Ale
 
Posts: 79
Joined: Wed Oct 25, 2006 12:06 pm
Location: La Fayette, NY, USA


Return to General

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 2 guests