Didn't filter wort - hopps in carboy

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Didn't filter wort - hopps in carboy

Postby echto » Sun Jun 18, 2006 6:04 pm

I think I goofed. This is my first batch of beer using the following recipe.

3 lb dry light malt extract
2 lb dry dark malt extract
1 oz Centennial Hops (60 mins)
1 oz Cascade Hops (5 mins)
Copper single-strain ale yeast.
Initial boil is 1.5 gallons. Added 3.5 gallons of cold water.

What I goofed on was not filtering the wort. The hopps are in the carboy. Did I just botch this batch? I prepared the wort last Tuesday night, the 13th, and added the yeast on Wednesday morning the 14th. Today, Sunday the 18th, its bubbling once evey 8 secs. I would like to bottle on the 21st if possible, but I won't if the batch is botched.

Any suggestions, re-assurances?

thx.
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Postby BillyBock » Tue Jun 20, 2006 1:06 am

You're fine. When it's done fermenting, just allow it enough time for it to clear so the hops and other particulates settle at the bottom before you rack it out of your carboy.
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Postby echto » Tue Jun 20, 2006 1:19 am

Thank you.
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Postby echto » Tue Jun 20, 2006 7:41 pm

The bubbling is now 1 every 5 seconds and when looking through the glass the activity inside looks like the surface of Jupiter, well, maybe not that fast, but active to say the least. The temperature has been a steady 68 degrees. What would be the maximum time allowed for a primary fermentation? And what would cause what appears to be an increase in fermenting?
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Congratulations, Sound Like a Healthy Ferment

Postby cleone » Tue Jun 20, 2006 8:20 pm

You are witnessing a healthy fermentation. Good job. Trust me, it will finish when it is ready. Just be patient.

When starting out in brewing, it seems that there are a lot of ways to spoil the brew if you don't follow the procedures just right. There is difference of opinion as to when you should consider the primary fermentation complete, when to transfer the batch to the secondary or if you should use a secondary at all. The truth is that your brew will be more forgiving than a lot of the texts will suggest.

Having gone through the same uncertainty myself, my advice is:

1. Wait for the airlock activity (bubbling) to slow to at least once every 60 seconds. If still unsure, measure your gravity and if it is within a few points of your target final gravity you are good. Average fermentation times for ales will be from 4 - 14 days, but can be longer. A lot depends on your OG, yeast and style of beer.

2. I like to leave just a wee bit of fermentation time left when transferring to the secondary (I wait for the airlock activity to reach 1 time in 60 -120 seconds). This way when it is in the secondary, it generates a CO2 layer above the surface of the beer. This aids in protecting the beer from airborne pollutants trapped in the secondary.

3. Two weeks is a safe amount of time to leave the beer in the secondary. But definitely make sure there is no more fermentation before bottling. If it is still bubbling (at all), leave it in longer. Also a completed stay in the secondary will yield no krausen on the beers surface. And verifying that the beer is close to the recipe's final gravity is highly recommended.

Hope this all help. You have just stepped into a larger universe. Welcome.
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Postby echto » Wed Jun 21, 2006 2:54 pm

Looks like I'll keep an eye on the airlock activity and go from there. Thank you for your suggestions. I look forward to enjoying this new hobby.
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Consider using a hop bag during boil

Postby cleone » Sun Jun 25, 2006 7:30 pm

Echto,

Back to your original question on this post: Have you considered using a hop bag? I always drop my hops into the bag (nylon mesh) and drop the bag into the boil. Its save me time and trouble of having to filter out the hops during transfer to the primary . . .


Chris
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Re: Consider using a hop bag during boil

Postby echto » Sun Jun 25, 2006 10:37 pm

cleone wrote:Echto,

Back to your original question on this post: Have you considered using a hop bag? I always drop my hops into the bag (nylon mesh) and drop the bag into the boil. Its save me time and trouble of having to filter out the hops during transfer to the primary . . .


Chris


No I haven't. That is a very good ideal. Thank you.
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