Styles of beer

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Styles of beer

Postby achau » Tue Jun 01, 2004 10:48 pm

Hi,
I am new to homebrewing and have made 2 batches. I enjoy it very much. My questions is what is the definition of the different styles?

Ales
Lager
Pilsner

Is it defined by the type of yeast used, the tastes of the beer, or method of brewing.

Thanks
achau
 
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There are only two types

Postby fitz » Wed Jun 02, 2004 8:13 am

There are only two types of beer
Ales -- top fermenting warmer temp
Lager -- bottom fermenting cooler temp
Types will affect flavor, but styles are more drastically noticed.
Most American commercial beer is American lager
These beers have many adjuncts and use lager yeast to ferment
Pilsner refers more to a style
There are many styles, you can see most of them in the recipe section of this site.
fitz
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Thanks for the reply

Postby achau » Wed Jun 02, 2004 1:56 pm

Thanks for the reply
achau
 
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Joined: Fri May 21, 2004 12:18 am

Full discription go to....

Postby Brewer2001 » Wed Jun 02, 2004 7:24 pm

Andy,

The beer festival guidelines were posted at www.beertown.org and click on GABF. These are the Craft Brewer (Pubs and Micro) guidelines for the 2004 compitition. This will give you a good starting point for your understanding of beer styles (with out spending money on books).

I do have a comment about the 'top' and 'bottom'
fermenting classification of yeast. Those are the older definitions and apply more to 'purer' yeast strains that were used in the past. All yeast tends to ferment 'on the top' of the beer and sinks to the bottom after fermentation has completed. The real key is the amount that the yeast will flocculate and fall out of suspenssion. This also has to do with temperature of the beer and the type of equipment that is being used. In general ale yeast ferment at a warmer temperatures (with the exception of Scottish yeasts) and lager yeast can ferment a cooler temperatures (or should).

Here is a gem, that most homebrewers and some craftbrewers do not know, the only way to determine if you are using ale or lager yeast is to have the finished beer tested for the sugar compound melibiose. You now have the clue look on this link for the explanations www.yeastlink.com/yeast-intro.html.

It took me a lot of $$$$ and hard work (sweat equity) to gain this knowlege use it well.

Good brewing,

Tom F.
Brewer2001
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brewer 2001

Postby fitz » Thu Jun 03, 2004 7:56 am

You left out which beer would have the sugar compound. I would guess that the lager would be without, since it tends to be the drier beer, but it sounds like you did the homework.
So which is it?
fitz
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Did you do your homework?

Postby Brewer2001 » Fri Jun 04, 2004 11:35 pm

Fitz,

You guessed it! I was trained by Steve Parks, apprenticed under Dick Cantwell and worked with Charlie McElevy. Here is the importance Steve Parks ownes the American Brewers Guild brewing school and has gone back to brewing in Vermont,he also writes for BYO. Dick Cantwell brews here in Seattle, has won numerous awards at the GABF and also writes for the BYO. Charlie McElevey was the first brewer/brewmaster that Paul Shipman hired to start Red Hook back in the eightys.

I see two of these guys on a regular basis and can call any of them if I need to. I have to do my homework!

Good brewing,

Tom F.
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I see

Postby fitz » Mon Jun 07, 2004 9:31 am

It sounds like you know the who's who of brewing.
Good for you in your profession.
fitz
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