Killing yeast????

What went wrong? Was this supposed to happen? Should I throw it out? What do I do now?

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Killing yeast????

Postby beef » Tue Nov 05, 2002 12:02 pm

I was wondering how to stop my wort from fermeting so much that it gets cidery. What can I do to get it to stop but make my beer drinkable?????
beef
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do onto yeast as you would have yeast do onto you...

Postby bredmakr » Tue Nov 05, 2002 12:23 pm

Try to stay positive. A healthy yeast culture will do you much good. To help you will need to answer a few questions. Are you using dry yeast or liquid yeast? Do you know what temperature the wort is when you pitch the yeast? Do you know if an even temperature within the fermenter is maintained during fermentation? Do you pitch a starter or original volume of yeast? The answers to these questions will determine the strategy to follow to solve your problem.
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Your information is here!!!

Postby beef » Tue Nov 05, 2002 12:31 pm

It is a liquid yeast, the temp the yeast was pitched at was was 64 and the temp has been kept at 60. and I use original volume when pitching. I hope you can help!!!!!
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Tell us

Postby Freon12 » Tue Nov 05, 2002 1:32 pm

Tell us about the beer and what type of sugers you may be fermenting.
The reason I ask is that "cidery" flavors are mostly caused by sugars like sucrose or table sugar.

If the beer is undrinkable, let the Fellas help you step by step like they did me. I sometimes make a drinkable beer now with plastic buckets.


Steve
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Acetic Acid....

Postby Mesa Maltworks » Tue Nov 05, 2002 5:39 pm

Although it is true that "cidery" flavors can evolve from the use of adjuncts such as sucrose and fructose, it is also possible that his "cidery" note you are describing is caused not by a sugar source, but by acetic acid being present in the beer. The most common source of this flavor is a slight infection via acetic acid producing bacteria. Just a thought....


Eric
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