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What went wrong? Was this supposed to happen? Should I throw it out? What do I do now?

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Postby cyrilleb » Thu Aug 12, 2004 12:17 pm

Hi,
I am a rather new home brewer. My first 2 batches were with poor quality ingredients and I won
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Postby just-cj » Fri Aug 13, 2004 5:22 pm

In general, Belgian beers (and Belgian yeasts) take longer to condition than beers such as pale ales or porters or browns. I'd say if you're getting drinkable Belgian ales in 3-4 months, you're right on schedule. The experience with your third batch sounds pretty normal, for a Belgian.

Are there any other beer styles that you enjoy? If so, do one Belgian, then a couple of quicker beers, then another Belgian, then another couple quicker beers, etc. That way you'll always have something good to drink, and once the Belgians start coming into their own, you'll have a neverending supply! 8)
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Postby cyrilleb » Mon Aug 16, 2004 4:56 am

Yes, I will do that indeed. I was checking recipes for pale ales actually. I also will try to brew somewhere else than in my flat, in order to improve at least these 3 things: a bigger boil, faster cooling and fermentation temperature, in a friend
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cidery

Postby Mirabeau » Tue Aug 17, 2004 11:34 am

may be one point to check, or two...
-what did you use as priming before bottling ?
"white sugar" or "table sugar" is known to bring a cidery taste in beer.

-what belgian yeast did u use ?
acid taste is usual in specifics styles of belgian beers such as lambic and gueuze... even "modern" yeasts, helping to reproduce a style of beer that used to be fermented by "spontaneous" yeasts naturally found in Bruxelles suburbs atmosphere, this natural yeast or reproduced yeast can bring this specific acidity.

but all belgian ales are not that acid... and all belgian ales don't need a long "garde" or rest after bottling... lambics and gueuze can rest several years before a sophisticated assembling of several batches is done, then they can rest for a long time again. gueuze is an assembling of old and young lambics... and is smoother and safer for your teeth health.

whatever, is there any other evidence of trouble in your beer such as poor head, viscosity, or smell ?

cheers
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Re: cidery

Postby just-cj » Wed Aug 18, 2004 1:23 am

Mirabeau wrote:may be one point to check, or two...
-what did you use as priming before bottling ?
"white sugar" or "table sugar" is known to bring a cidery taste in beer.

I don't agree with this, sorry. Table sugar got a bad reputation in the old homebrew kits that said something like, "add contents of can and 3 pounds of table sugar to five gallons of water." Yes, that will definitely give you a bad, cidery-tasting beer. But, priming with 4-5 oz (120-150 g) is fine. I use rock sugar that I get in the grocery store, which is basically table sugar that has been crystalized (similar to Belgian candi sugar) and it gives me great carbonation with no off-flavors at all. I've also used regular table sugar with the same good results. 8)
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re: sugar cider

Postby Mirabeau » Wed Aug 18, 2004 3:07 am

"white sugar" or "table sugar" is known to bring a cidery taste in beer.


I just said that table sugar "is known" to bring bad taste.

You're right when underlining that sometimes what used to be the truth may be now a legend or a "has been" verity.

In conclusion, every experience has to be done to be validated. I shall give a try with table sugar and give a feedback in a while...

If one hundred stupid guys repeat one !@#$, one scientist will not convince anyone of the truth.


Cheers !
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Re: re: sugar cider

Postby just-cj » Wed Aug 18, 2004 4:16 am

Mirabeau wrote:In conclusion, every experience has to be done to be validated. I shall give a try with table sugar and give a feedback in a while...

I couldn't agree more! I'll be looking forward to your update! :D
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Postby cyrilleb » Thu Aug 19, 2004 9:56 am

Hi,

Here what I used:
3rd batch: Wyeast 1214 in primary then harvested yeast from a 75cc Chimay Blue (half of it introduced in secondary, the rest at when priming)
I used light dried malt extract for priming. There is a lot of yeast in my bottles.

4th batch: Wyeast 1388, primed with candy sugar.

My too cents about white sugar: my friend who introduced me to homebrew was using kits and was putting a lot of sugar. His beer does taste and smell like cider. Not great. Personally I wouldn
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Postby cyrilleb » Sun Aug 22, 2004 12:06 pm

I was trying that Belgium ale the other night.

The head doesn't stay, and it mad rather large bobbles when I poored the beer. No specific off flavours in the smell.
The beer is just too bitter and a bit arsh. Just like for the previous beer, I feel it is fading avay slowly.

Cheers.
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