New Stout recipe...

Grains, malts, hops, yeast, water and other ingredients used to brew. Recipe reviews and suggestions.

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New Stout recipe...

Postby HardcoreLegend » Mon May 19, 2003 1:15 pm

What do you think of this? I am trying to come up with an absolutely insane Imperial Stout. I used lots of dark grains. I want a deep dark roasty, coffee flavoring. Please feel free to give input.

1 lbs. English Chocolate Malt
1 lbs. Crystal Malt 120
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Heavier

Postby fitz » Tue May 20, 2003 3:25 am

I would go heavier on the Roasted barley, and back off of the patent for my personal preferences. It just seems that if I put much patent in it at all, the beer tastes a little on the burnt side Roasted will give you more of the grainy taste
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sugar

Postby Fraoch » Thu May 22, 2003 4:47 am

Why use sugar????I never understand why people feel obliged to use sugar in their recipes,it can leave winey flavopur to the finished product.The germans have got it right, sugar has no place in the production of beer
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Watch it

Postby fitz » Thu May 22, 2003 10:55 am

Watch it, many here do not take kindly to even mention of the german purity law. There may be a lynching. I use very little adjuncts if any in my brew, but that's my preference. Some recipes need it. It would be kind of hard to make a fruit or berry beer without the berries, not to mention Wheat beers.
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Oh No

Postby BillyBock » Fri May 23, 2003 7:32 am

Fraoch, now you're not trolling are you :-)

Seriously, I'm a big fan of all malt beers myself. But I believe, to each his own. If a guy wants to make a brew that's 50/50 barley/sugar, then that's his business. His taste buds may hate him, but the hobby affords you the ability to experiment. My personal limit on adjuncts is 10%. Anyhoo....

v/r
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Whoa!

Postby BillyBock » Fri May 23, 2003 7:41 am

What's the OG on this bad boy, about 1.100 for 5 gals? The only suggestions I'd make are:
(1) consider black treacle in place of the brown sugar--it'll give you more flavor complexity, and
(2) use a humongo starter, or pitch on a previous yeast cake.

Man, I got Impy Stout envy now :-( Where's my recipe?.....

v/r
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Fraoch: An expatriate Brit? Or has my memory gone to hell?..

Postby Mesa Maltworks » Fri May 23, 2003 6:43 pm

If my memory doesn't fail me and I am correct in your origin, remember that your home country is the PROVINCE of the sugar addition as a common practice! :)

My response is intended to be light hearted, but also as an update for those not in the know. A large proportion of the most reknowned Bitters, ESBs, Milds, Browns... etc... are adjuncted with dextrose. This makes complete sense due to the fact that these beers are designed as session ales (READ: can drink more with less intoxication). By using malts bills supplemented with sugar they can produce a tasty tipple with the right amount of alcohol, body and flavor to achieve the goals of inducing the consumer to purchase more of it. After all, in the beer business, this is THE GOAL!

There are significant differences in the application of brewing sugars when considering commerical UK brewers vs. American macrobrewery approaches. The better UK breweries still deliver the flavors expected of the labeled style regardless of their supplementations. This seems mostly untrue in America (example: Miller Lite is labeled as a "True Pilsner Beer"). Unfortunately, the American macrobrewers have taken this idea of gravity supplimentation to the extreme by producing an increasingly flavorless alcohol delivery mechanism via their use of raw starch sources such as rice and corn.

What I am attempting to say here is that in the right proportions, sugar supplimentations to the wort CAN contribute positive attributes in the resultant beer. (ask the Belgians!)

But, the overuse of kettle sugars can lead to vinuous off flavors that will detract from the flavor profile intended.

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Tut, Tut,

Postby Fraoch » Sun May 25, 2003 5:09 am

Nothing wrong with German purity laws, I applaud the fact that at least ONE country sets itself above the others by NOT compromising on ingredients.Yes , english beers love to use sugars but if you have followed my posts, you would know that i lost faith in english brewers years ago.The main reason i started making my own was for the fact that i wanted to drink beer, not fermented sugar which if i am correct, hell, feel free to correct me, was used as a cheap alternative to grain to begin with, the fact thats its not really that much cheaper than grain anymore is irrelevant.The brewers lost thier way, they cut corners, then look for positives to sell it with,unique flavour profiles etc as slogans.It was a cost cutting exercise, the manufacture of money outweighs the manufacture of a product,Mesa, THAT IS THE GOAL!
When you brew at home, you are given the opportunity to make a beer that uses the finest of ingredients, something that you will not be able to buy easily.Instead, time and time again, home brewers try to emulate the rubbish that you can purchase at the nearest store.The post asked for input, feel free.I felt free, i gave input.I read a recipe that could well be fine, then ,DINGO!!!!!! brown sugar.What the heck, you never know till you taste it, but would the inclusion of brown sugar add???? I doubt it.An imperial stout, concerned about body and alcohol level???And so the inclusion of sugar????Come on?!

Whats trolling anyway?
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Fraoch, Scots Honey Beer?

Postby brakspears » Wed May 28, 2003 9:10 pm

Fraoch, is I believe, a beer brewed in Scotland, with the addition of honey, instead of sugar, so much for not adding sugars to the brew, any way, onto not adding sugars to kit beers, I won the New Zealand homebrew national trophy, Best in Show,(2001) with a Coopers Stout kit, made at double strength, ie, twice the extract, and no sugar, so I feel that, as has been expressed here, the addition of sugars can seriously detract from the required style, bringing strange flavours and headbreaking hangovers, so no sugars in my brews, have fun, brewing this weekend, Nigel.
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Fraoch....

Postby Fraoch » Thu May 29, 2003 2:47 am

Original recipe for Fraoch ( a heather scented and flavoured beer) was lost at the slaughter of the last Pict, who died rather than give the secret over to the marauding barbarians, (Scots).All recipes for Fraoch are speculative to say the least, they may have used honey, they may not have.It certainly would have been a very much sought after commodity, particularly for its medicinal and preservative powers.
Congratulations on winning the NZ champs, although i must admit, my intention was not to get on an anti sugar crusade, i just wish people wouldnt automatically assume that it is necessary in order to achieve a level of alcohol.
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