Refrigerator Question

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Refrigerator Question

Postby l48shark » Wed Jan 01, 2003 7:45 pm

Would it be safe to run an electric fridge in my bedroom closet? I know this sounds crazy, but hear me out. Our master bath has his and her closets. My closet happens to have an electrical outlet. On the other side of the exterior wall is the biergarten I constructed last summer. So if I run a small fridge in my closet, I could have cold draught homebrew on the patio mounted right on the side of the house! Sounds really cool, but I was not sure about running a fridge in such a small room. Your thoughts?

Cheers,
Ford
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Sounds good in theory

Postby fitz » Thu Jan 02, 2003 2:23 am

Souns good if you can get enough cool air into the coils of the fridge to get rid of heat build up. Many people build fridges into their cabinet work. but there is always some room for air flow. Also, be careful about where you drill your holes for the lines. You may drill through a freon line and the fridge would be worthless.
Good Luck
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Vents

Postby Freon12 » Thu Jan 02, 2003 1:52 pm

Hi,

As you know, refrigerators use "Freon12" to exchange heat from the inside to the outside of the cabinet via exspansion/absorbtion.
So, when heat is removed from the box, it must be released elsewhere because heat(a form of enrgy) cannot be destroyed, only changed to another form.

In other words, where can the heat that is rejected from the condenser go? It can't be left to build up in the closet. Figure out where it can go, and wha-la.

Good luck,
Steve

Oh and that freeze-dryer thing, I'm gonna freeze-dry some yeast and test it.
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Vent the Heat

Postby l48shark » Thu Jan 02, 2003 1:59 pm

I posted this same question in the off-topic area of the Corvette forum and someone suggested putting a metal jacket on the back of the fridge and using a small fan to vent the heat outside. (He had done something similar before with success.) I thought that sounded like a good idea. A low tech solution that might work is to simply install a louvered door. I will probably try that first. :-)

Good luck with the yeast trails!

Cheers,
Ford
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Amperage?

Postby HomeBrew » Thu Jan 02, 2003 6:37 pm

If this is a small (dorm-sized) fridge, you'll be okay, but if it's larger, you'll have to see how much amperage it pulls and what else is on the circuit -- you might overload...
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Good Point

Postby l48shark » Thu Jan 02, 2003 6:41 pm

I will keep that in mind when shopping for a fridge. (I do not think a corny keg will fit in a dorm fridge, so maybe a little larger?) The motor for the jacuzzi tub is on this circuit, but I am not sure what else.

Cheers,
Ford
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Vent the ceiling

Postby fitz » Fri Jan 03, 2003 2:56 am

If you do the louvered door approach, you may want to put a vent into the ceiling of the closet for the heat to go up(that is if the ceiling goes into your atic or gable) I have louvered doors on some of my closets, and the heat that gets in there wants to stay a bit. The vent in the ceiling will give the heat somewhere to go.
Of course if the vent in the ceiling draws well, you maybe able to get by with a grate on the bottom of the closet door like they use for cold air returns in your HVAC.
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second that

Postby Freon12 » Fri Jan 03, 2003 4:19 pm

Yep, I agree with Fitz, that's a good one.
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Home freeze drying yeast ?

Postby Mesa Maltworks » Thu Jan 09, 2003 1:26 pm

Whoa... I missed that thread. I'd like to hear about this one.

Another long term, safe storage method for yeast involves using osmotically balanced, autoclaved distilled water. Yeast prepared in such a way can last up to a year. Lab trials have shown that the yeast survive this handling better than storage under a supernate of beer. I used to do this with my proprietary strains when I ran my brewing microbio lab serving brewpubs and micros. If you are interested I can explain how this is acomplished.

I don't know the specifics about self freeze drying yeast, but I do recall a lecture I attended in Arizona where Yeast Labs, Wyeast and Lallemand and Safle were represented and they discussed a topic which you might need to consider. When discussing the topic of dry yeast production, the dry guys (Safle & Lallemand) stated that the process is very stressful on the yeast and only the most healthy among the population survive with little mutation. They further said that this is why they pack such a huge cell count in their packages... to ensure that enough of the healthiest cells end up dominating the fermentation.

I would like to learn about the self-freeze drying method you described. If it is no trouble, could you re-post it as a new thread?

Eric
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