how do I maximize burner performance

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how do I maximize burner performance

Postby bredmakr » Tue Oct 29, 2002 10:20 am

How can I tell if I'm getting the most burn for my buck? I try to keep the flames blue with little to no 'jump' from the burner exit ports to the base of the flame. Can I get more out of it? When I crank it all up the flames are yellow and white and the thing screams. A total MORE POWER moment but for some reason I think that when operating it this way I am wasting a lot of propane. Does anyone have any comment?
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Air baffle

Postby jayhawk » Tue Oct 29, 2002 1:34 pm

The instructions with my burner say to make sure the flame is always burning blue. To adjust the flame colour, there is an adjustable air intake baffle located on the burner arm after the fuel hose input. Here, outside air is drawn in and mixed with the propane. When the flame is totally blue, it is burning as hot as possible, therefore achieving peak performance. I suspect that your yellow flames at max fuel input are wasting fuel as they are not burning at the hottest temp possible. When you crank the throttle, the fuel/air mix excessively favours the "fuel" end of the ratio and there is not enough oxygen mixing with the fuel to allow for the hottest burn possible. If equipped, adjust the air intake baffle so that you get blue flame throughout all ranges of fuel input.
One improvement I am considering is setting up a sheet metal "screen" around 3/4 of the burner. It seems to me that a lot of heat is lost around the sides of the burner, and I hate to see money burning right in front of my eyes. However, I am not sure if putting this metal screen around the base would really contain enough heat to make the expense worthwhile. I suspect the difference would be pennies per batch.
Just curious, what BTUs does your burner run. I think mine is in the 30-45K range. Does the job for 5 & 6 gal batches and mashes. Have you ever figured out the cost of propane per batch?
Chris
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Did someone say "Fire"?

Postby Freon12 » Tue Oct 29, 2002 2:37 pm

I agree with Jay, blue is what you want.

As far as tweaking--well, a larger propane tank helps stablize pressure at different tempretures (or an exspensive regulator)and if the intake air to the baffle is cold it burns hotter.

I liken it to hotrod cars and air intakes, if they are smoothed out with a buffer and the throat is smooth, it will melt butter.;)

That's right, I'm suggesting a machine shop for your burner to be ported and jetted.

I have tested this on a 170,000btu burner at work with a lab pyrometer and it kicks butt!(heats almost 15% faster with an increase of economy about 12%).

fire, Fire, FIRE!

Freon "The Pyromaniac"
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175K burner from Oklahoma Joe

Postby bredmakr » Wed Oct 30, 2002 2:50 am

Got my as part of a 40 qt turkey fryer kit from Oklahoma Joe. I have adjusted the air baffel to get the blue flamage but since it takes 20-30 minutes to boil 5 gallons I was wondering if I was doing something wrong.
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ported and jetted...please do tell

Postby bredmakr » Wed Oct 30, 2002 2:53 am

I happen to work at a place of business which has a complete machine shop. If you could be more specific I can just tell my master machinist buddy what to do, or is all I have to tell him is to port and jet it out?
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Master?

Postby Freon12 » Wed Oct 30, 2002 1:52 pm

A master knows alot, He will probibly know, but so you sound good here you go...

Cast burners have a rough surface inside that the gas "rubs" against as it passes. This causes unwanted turbulance and air/gas ratio's.
If the inside were smooth, it would make more constant the mix and amaze you with boost.

I assume that your burner is of the China design and is cast iron.(See picture at morebeer.com under burners 170,00btu)
If not let me know, I'm gonna shop where you shop!

You need to find out the oriface size diameter exactly for your burner(btu=size) and have it measured make sure it's right.

Try one standard and one .001 larger after you smooth out the cavity and see what happens.

You can test this while brewing by timing how many seconds to boil from 80f before and after and be sure to keep the regulator setting the same.(!@#$ science/math guys trying to eliminate variables).

The master will know if .001 or .002 would be right because the machining will change the required amount of fuel.

Ask if it would be possible to make an adjustable oriface. (Thousands are awful small).
OR, make three or four sizes that could be changed for testing to find the optimum size for the modified burner.

Also if possible, measure the air tempreture coming into the damper and see if this winter as it gets colder if my threoy is correct due to cold air being more dense and making the fuel "mileage" improve.(If you do, keep a log I would like to see it).

If so, running a tube over the intake and leaking a small amount of Co2 over it in the summer should give the same result.
Sort of a tube in tube turbo-intercooler.

There are a few ways to cool the incoming air, your a homebrewer, I'm sure you'll find a (Cheaper) way.
If you need anything else, just ask, you know where to find me.

"hotrod" Freon
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