Reusing yeast from Primary

Brewing processes and methods. How to brew using extract, partial or all-grain. Tips and tricks.

Moderator: slothrob

almost

Postby Fraoch » Tue Feb 25, 2003 12:53 am

Interesting technique mesa,i had kind of worked out my questions later that night when it was all mulling over in my head.Except for the krausen bit, i thought you had some technique that would allow it to sit on top,INGENIUS!!!! i was thinking.Seems a complicated way of doing things, so i have 2 more questions for you if thats OK?
Why not mash at a higher temp so Fg is at 1017 and just let the yeast do its stuff to terminal, im guessing that the time taken to ferment through dextrins would add too much to your brew schedule and it is therefore easier for you and quicker to manipulate the fermentation process??
Also, do you really mean -1c which is just below point of freezing or 1c, just above??

Thanks for taking the time Mesa,

Gavin
Fraoch
Double IPA
Double IPA
 
Posts: 215
Joined: Fri May 18, 2001 5:36 am

Replies, duex...

Postby Mesa Maltworks » Tue Feb 25, 2003 10:17 am

"Why not mash at a higher temp so Fg is at 1017 and just let the yeast do its stuff to terminal, im guessing that the time taken to ferment through dextrins would add too much to your brew schedule and it is therefore easier for you and quicker to manipulate the fermentation process??"

I could change to a higher mash temp, but there are other effects from doing this other than dextrin production that I do not desire. This technique of cooling to arrest fermentation leads to very consistent results. Due to slight variations in mashing temperatures, slight drifts... undershoots... overshoots... etc would render changing that part of the equation less reliable than what I am now doing. Also... through subsequent high cell concentration re-pitches, the rate of fermentation increases as does the ability of the yeast to ferment down lower. Using the cooling technique, I can always account for this. If I didn't, each subsequent batch would ferment to a lower terminal point resulting in a drier beer than I desired.

"Also, do you really mean -1c which is just below point of freezing or 1c, just above??"

Yep... -1c. This is the optimal point for conditioning rests. It ensure complete arrest, great and quick flocculation, maintains the yeast health by slowing glycolysis, offers a buffer from autolysis and prevents virtually all bacterial growth.

Any better?

Eric
User avatar
Mesa Maltworks
Strong Ale
Strong Ale
 
Posts: 474
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2001 11:16 pm
Location: Georgetown, Grand Cayman Island

yeh, thanks for that

Postby Fraoch » Wed Feb 26, 2003 12:59 am

Cheers for endulging me.it has been most interesting. Looks like i need to get myself off to brew school one day.
Gavin
Fraoch
Double IPA
Double IPA
 
Posts: 215
Joined: Fri May 18, 2001 5:36 am

Previous

Return to Techniques, Methods, Tips & How To

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest