Cold Conditioning

Brewing processes and methods. How to brew using extract, partial or all-grain. Tips and tricks.

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Cold Conditioning

Postby FINA » Tue Feb 18, 2003 8:15 am

I recently brewed up some scotch ale, racked it to the secondary, and am about to put it in cold conditioning 32-35 F. I'm going to leave it in there 6-10 weeks, I haven't quiet decided on the length, probably closer to 6 than 10. I am using White Labs 033, Klassic Ale Yeast. After this cold conditioning will I need to pitch additional yeast to insure that my beer is carbonated or will there still be sufficient enough yeast still in the beer to carbonate. It doesn't really matter if it takes longer to carbonate, as I do not plan on drinking it for some time, maybe to celebrate the new college football season.

Thanks,
FINA
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How 'bout this

Postby jayhawk » Tue Feb 18, 2003 10:14 am

Before placing the beer in cold conditioning, why not rack the beer again to another vessel. Then, you can harvest some yeast from the secondary and store it until you are ready to package. Before you want to bottle, you can restart the saved yeast and pitch it to the brew along your with priming solution.
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How would this work?

Postby jeffmc » Tue Feb 18, 2003 5:04 pm

This sounds like a very cool process, but I have some questions:
- When you cold condition do you still use an airlock while the beer is conditioning?
- What temperature do you condition it at?
- After condition I'm assuming that you rack again, then pitch some yeast. What temperature do you leave it at then - more like room temp?
- How long would you leave it with the yeast before bottling, or would you do it immediately?

thanks
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Explanation

Postby jayhawk » Tue Feb 18, 2003 7:08 pm

I have never actually cold conditioned. I brew ales, and do not have an extra fridge to allow for cooling. I usually just bottle the brew after a few weeks and then stick them in the garage to cold condition, if you can call it that. Of course, this only works in winter. The method I put forward in the above post is one that I have never actually used, but has been recommended to me by my HBS in case I ever needed to repitch.

-I would certainly use an airlock while cold conditioning. I have heard that one should place a cotton wad soak in alcohol in the airlock as opposed to water, or simply add a very small amount of water. As the carboy chills, there will be a reduction in air pressure inside causing air to be drawn in. You want to prevent the water in your airlock from being sucked in as well.
-I think most people cold condition as close to freezing as possible.
- You would to add the repitched yeast at high krausen, when they are at peak activity and mostly in suspension, and then bottle immediately. (hitting high krausen is an ideal scenario...I have never been able to properly time high krausen, so don't worry too much if you miss it, as there should still be adequate yeast. You just don't want all of the yeast to tucker out in your starter before pitching) If you are using ale yeast, leave the bottles at ale temps for a week or two to allow for carbonation, then feel free to chill again. If I was doing this, I would add the yeast starter and priming solution to the fermenter, then rack the beer on top to allow for a good mixing of the solutions and ensure even distribution of yeast and primer.
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too late

Postby FINA » Wed Feb 19, 2003 7:02 am

Sounds like a pretty good idea jayhawk, but I don't have another empty fermenter (already more beer in it). Maybe i'll give it a try next time.
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Too much beer

Postby jayhawk » Wed Feb 19, 2003 8:36 am

It sure sucks when you have too much beer eh...darn :) In December I had all 4 of my fermenters going wiht 4 different batches, and that did get a little hectic when it came time to rack...I had to use a mash tun as a temporary fermenter. Good brewing.
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