Mash Hopping?

Brewing processes and methods. How to brew using extract, partial or all-grain. Tips and tricks.

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Mash Hopping?

Postby andytv » Thu Oct 03, 2002 9:28 am

I'm intirgued by the mash hopping concept, but know nothing about (and I don't get Zymurgy). Can someone summarize the concept for me. I hope to use it tommorrow with my APA, which I typically use perle to bitter, and cascade to flavor (and aroma & dry hop).

Andy
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courtesy of jayhawk

Postby Gravity Thrills » Thu Oct 03, 2002 11:48 am

Chris posted this link to the Paddock Wood site that has a good detailed article on the subject:

www.paddockwood.com/guide_mash_hopping_sedam.html

That ol' Sierra perle/cascade combo is the brew I also immediately thought would really get a charge out of mash hopping - looks like you're gonna beat me to it.

Brew straight and true,
Jim
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Preliminary Results

Postby jayhawk » Thu Oct 03, 2002 2:11 pm

I just sampled from the secondary of a mash hopped pale ale I brewed on Sep 25. The hop flavour is definetly starting to show. The beer is still at 1.018, so there is still some way to go until bottling. I suspect that as the sweetnes of the wort is reduced through fermentation, the hop flavour will come through even more. I was hoping for a little more hop aroma, similar to the effect of dryhopping, but that effect has not come through yet.

I bittered with 10 AAU of centennial, and the bitterness is perfect for me so far. The article recommends adjusting the bittering hops up, and I went up from 9.4 to 10 AAU, not a significant jump. Obviously, it is up to each brewer as to the bittering, but I would suggest not racheting up the AAU's too much the first time round, that way you can judge for yourself the effects of mash hopping. So far I am pleased with the results of the mash hopping, and I will keep you posted.
Chris
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intrigued and ignorant?

Postby Fraoch » Fri Oct 04, 2002 2:41 am

wouldnt any hop aroma attempted to be gained fron mash hopping be lost during wort boiling??I though aroma was lost if boiled for over 10mins and likewise for flavour at boil time over 1/2hr.Surely mash hopping is only good for bittering and then boil time should be kept to no longer than 1hr.Then again, i too know nothing of the concept of mash hopping. i must admit though, from what i have heard, i remain somewhat sceptical.

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ashamed am I

Postby Gravity Thrills » Fri Oct 04, 2002 11:28 am

Yep, I've been derelict in my brewing duties. It's my wife's B-day weekend, so this one's out (I've learned THAT lesson!). Next weekend I have an out of town wedding that I nearly opted out of specifically to brew. But, the wedding is in my old home town of Chicago, and I'll get a chance to hit one of my fave brewpubs (Goose Island). So, the southeastern installment of BeerTools Wit-A-Palooza 2K2 WILL BE BREWED IN 2 WEEKS.

Nunc Bibendum Est
(now it's time to drink)
Jim
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Find Mesa's response

Postby Gravity Thrills » Fri Oct 04, 2002 11:45 am

Heatherman!

I asked those same questions a couple of weeks ago in the initial threads on this subject (look for threads on witbier and pumpkin ale from 2-4 weeks ago). The always informative Mesa responded that in fact mash hopping was ONLY good for flavor and aroma, but not good for bittering. I understand why bittering doesn't work - no boil to isomerize the alpha acids. Mesa doesn't think anybody really knows how it exactly works, but the flavor and aromatic compounds in the hops are somehow magi-tastically bound to the mash extract components and stabilized to the point that they are not volatilized in the boil. The web link to the Paddock Wood article provided by jayhawk says essentially the same thing, and again gives an incomplete answer as to why it works.

(Did you ever see the Simpsons with the drink called the "Flaming Homer"? Homer says, "I don't know the scientific term for it, but fire made it good." I figure it;s the same deal here).

The basic battle plan, according to Mesa Eric and the online article Eric (are they the same person?), is to double your usual flavor and aroma hop additions and put them in the tun at mash in. Then, add a little more bittering hops in the boil to compensate for the amount of bitterness that is usually contributed by the flavor and aroma additions.

If you try it let us know how it turns out. I figure I'll give it a try the next time the American pale comes up on the brew schedule.

Cheers,
Jim
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Question

Postby Freon12 » Fri Oct 04, 2002 1:09 pm

What form of hop are you using?
I thought plugs would bitter at a higher rate, but we need a field test.


No quippy ending this time.
Steve
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Mash spicing

Postby Freon12 » Sun Oct 06, 2002 5:15 pm

Jim, you were right about the spices gaining steam as it ages. This may also be the case for hops?

Wit #2 ready to mash, Come on man, your getting behind.

Cheers
Steve
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Pellets

Postby jayhawk » Sun Oct 06, 2002 6:35 pm

I used pellets. I followed the logic of the article (linked above) which says that pellets offer more surface area and therefore would impart more of the desired compounds in to the wort during the mash.
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