Belgian Dark Ale yeast question

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Belgian Dark Ale yeast question

Postby pcutti19 » Mon Oct 29, 2007 4:29 pm

Has anyone experimented with adding another yeast into seconday fermentation?

When i am ready to keg or bottle, i have heard some add yeast then for bottle conditioning and carbonation. does that mean no bottling sugar?

thanks for your time.
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bottling yeast and sugar

Postby slothrob » Mon Oct 29, 2007 5:04 pm

I've never needed to add yeast at bottling. Usually it's only needed after a long lagering (more than a month, perhaps) or very long aging (like the 6 month or year-long aging of some Belgiain Ales and Barleywines).

Either way, the yeast still needs priming sugar to convert to CO2 for carbonation.
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Postby pcutti19 » Mon Oct 29, 2007 6:19 pm

thanks.

I do think this is going to be a long bottle/keg aging beer. I am thinking 6-8 months. Which yeast should i consider?
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Belgian Yeasts

Postby slothrob » Tue Oct 30, 2007 8:32 am

Sorry, I don't brew Belgian Beers, maybe someone else can chime in.

I think it depends on the effect you're after. I always hear good things about WLP500 and WLP530. The first is a fruity strain, the second is a low frutiness strain (more earthy/phenolic, I'd assume). WLP550 is a phenolic strain that looks recommended for Belgian Browns.
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