Is this thing on?

Brewing processes and methods. How to brew using extract, partial or all-grain. Tips and tricks.

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Is this thing on?

Postby mickeymac » Mon Apr 15, 2002 8:56 pm

Where is everyone? Are you all at the post office mailing the income tax returns? Anyhow, I just thought I'd follow up on an inquiry I made a while back: whether wort can be kept overnight. I did it, apparently without any problems. Making an all-grain batch, I prepared my wort on a Sunday night and left it in the covered brewpot at room temperature overnight. Getting it to a boil the next morning didn't take too long, and I was off to the races. I don't think the overall time was much more than it would have been had I gone through the entire procedure without interruption. Anyhow, I found this process to be useful in a house where two small kids make mid-day brewing all but impossible. And thanks for all your suggestions.
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Uhh.. don't try this one again !!!

Postby Mesa Maltworks » Tue Apr 16, 2002 5:58 am

Simply leaving the kettle covered with pre-boil wort in it is not a good idea. Although the wort is to be boiled the next day, killing the active bacteria, the most aggressive of bacteria, those that produce acetic & lactic acid, can affect the final beer. This group of bacteria are what turns a mash sour within 8 hours and therfore can do the same to your pre-boiled wort. Although you will kill the bacteria, the flavor will be set in the wort and will not disappear. You might have gotten lucky this time, but I wouldn't do it that way again in the future !
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Got it.

Postby mickeymac » Tue Apr 16, 2002 7:55 am

It seems the only way I get anything done these days is on sheer luck.

P.S. I'm glad to hear someone is still out there. ;-)
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Can this happen to extract?

Postby jayhawk » Tue Apr 16, 2002 11:10 am

I have a large 15L tub of malt extract. I brew small 23L batches (about 1 per month) and have been slowly using this tub of extract. The last two batches have come out sour, so I am now wondering if the extract could have gone bad, therefore affecting the taste of the beer. The extract tub seals quite well, but I have reopened it many times, so it has defintely been exposed to air and possibly bacteria. It is also possible that that beer could have been infected along the production process, but I like to think I am very clean about the whole deal.
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agreed -- but how 'bout pasturizing?

Postby entguy » Tue Apr 16, 2002 5:55 pm

wow, I can't believe mickeymac got away with that one; ground grain is a wonderful source of Lactobacillus, right? if you've gotta split the process at this point, I would think at least bringing it up to a scalding temp would help the odds, don't you? Minimize the bacterial load before the overnight incubation period, but not have the hassle of doing the full hour boil, coil, FV transfer & pitch... it's my $.02 at any rate -- entguy
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I suppose it is possible...

Postby Mesa Maltworks » Wed Apr 17, 2002 2:31 pm

I suppose it is possible for the condensed extract to become infected by bacteria, but the high SG combined with the lack of a high moisture content makes it less likely... the worry is more about the mold family... bacillus, etc... This would show up as a surface mold and they can also produce souring. When using large containers of liquid extract, it is better to break it up into the voulmes you use it in to prevent this possibility. Another method is to blanket the container head space with CO2. If you allow it in gently, it will displace the air in the container and sit on top of the extract since it is heavier than air.

A much better alternative is to switch to extra light, unhopped dry malt extract. Advantages: Storability, it is cheaper because you get more gravity points per pound and you don't pay for water to be shipped and you can create even the lightest beers to their appropriate colors unlike liquid malt extract which undergoes significant carmelization (darkening) during the condensing process. XLDME also lacks the "processed flavor" that I have recently noticed postors to this forum discussing.

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"Scalding" temp won't help much...

Postby Mesa Maltworks » Wed Apr 17, 2002 2:36 pm

Unfortunately, there are families of bacteria (particularly the acid producers) that love anerobic, below 160 deg. F. sugar solutions.... sounds like brewer's wort doesn't it ! So, although it might hold the meanies at bay a little longer, it is still a BAD practice that will bite you in the A** eventually.

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