Keeping wort overnight?

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Keeping wort overnight?

Postby mickeymac » Fri Feb 22, 2002 2:59 pm

Having two small kids in the house makes it difficult to set aside a block of time big enough to complete an all-grain batch from mashing to sealing the fermenter. So, once the grain has been mashed and sparged, can the wort be stored for a short period of time (e.g., overnight or for a full day) to allow the boil to be done later? If so, should it be kept in the refrigerator?
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I wouldn't

Postby l48shark » Fri Feb 22, 2002 3:49 pm

Keep in mind that the vat of chilled wort is a smorgasbord for infecting bacteria. I suppose refrigeration may inhibit their activity, but you want to pitch the yeast as soon as possible. I was sold what turned out to be old liquid yeast for a stout. Even with a 12-hour starter culture, the wort endured a 72-hour lag before noticeable fermentation commenced. I just checked the beer in the secondary and it tastes absolutely horrid. So while boiling the wort may kill the beasties, they may have already done the damage of off-flavors. Looks like hefe for St. Pats. :(
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Thanks

Postby mickeymac » Fri Feb 22, 2002 8:00 pm

It would make life a bit easier, but I had a feeling it wasn't a good idea. Well, tomorrow's brew-day and the kids are gone for the day. Sorry to hear about your recent problems.
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Jam??

Postby Fraoch » Fri Feb 22, 2002 11:50 pm

When jam is made the hot syrup is put into scrupulously sterile containers and then sealed. The cooling action creates a vaccuum which I am sure you are more than aware of.Jam lasts for years, there's no reason why you shouldn't be able to do the same with wort. Make sure you arrest conversion though by raising the temp, you may end up with the first stout to brew out to zero!!!!
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Campden tablets...maybe???

Postby dartedplus » Sun Feb 24, 2002 4:06 pm

I think it would work if you put campden tablets into the wort. I know when making wine, they tell you to put one tablet per gallon into the liquid and let it set overnight before adding the yeast to it. This basically kills all of the bacteria that are in it and doesnt let it spoil. then when you add your yeast, they are all alone and can have the feast without being bothered by any bacteria. I am pretty sure that it wont dont anything to change the flavor of your beer. I dont know all of this for sure, but it seems like it would work. Good luck, Ed
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Hmm

Postby mickeymac » Sun Feb 24, 2002 7:26 pm

Thanks, Ed, I think I'll try that one busy weekend. Maybe I'll experiment with an extract batch so it won't be such a loss if things go south on me.
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Wort overnight

Postby Andy » Mon Feb 25, 2002 11:57 am

I have done this successfully many times. Keep in mind the boil on day 2 will kill anything that get in. You do want to keep wort in clean covered containers. This is a great way to balance family and brewing. Give it a try.
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Botulism

Postby Freon12 » Wed Feb 27, 2002 6:39 pm

I urge anyone not to attempt this. The PH of wort is not low enough to protect agaist botulism spores which are deadly! If you never read anything I ever write again, please heed this warning.
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Botuli not an issue here...

Postby Mesa Maltworks » Thu Feb 28, 2002 8:32 am

Since the original postee stated that he planned to boil the stored wort, if botuli were entrained in the brewing liquor, it would be destroyed when the boil commences. Now if the concern was airborne botuli, if the vessel holding the pre-boiled wort is not sealed ( from the post I assumed he at least was doing this) there is a concern if there is significant air circulation.

Another method that eliminates all concerns is to freeze the pre-boiled wort. This topic has been covered both in forums and brew mags. BUT.. it is really best to wait until you have the time to complete the batch in one session. You may think you save time by splitting it up, but it actually takes MORE time due to repetitive tasks like setup, re-sanitization, re-heating... etc. If you are really this time crunched, do partial mashes or steep batches. Using the proper ingredient choices and techniques, these options can produce beer as good as all-graining. This has been proven time and time again in tasting panels and competitions.
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Good news

Postby mickeymac » Fri Mar 01, 2002 7:08 am

I think I'm going to try it next time I brew.
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My unique problem

Postby mickeymac » Fri Mar 01, 2002 7:11 am

I'm brewing gluten-free beer for my wife, so I don't have the luxury of doing partial mashes. If I can only find some buckwheat, corn, or sorghum malt extract I'll be in business.
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